Event

International Kwyl/Patois Day - Film Afternoon

Event Date(s): 28/10/2009 - 29/10/2009

Location: Main library, AV room, floor 3, Humanities


The Main Library and the Faculty of Humanities and Education will observe International Kwéyòl/Patois Day on Wednesday 28th October, 2009, with a Film Afternoon, specially featuring Prof Ian Robertson’s “Guyana's Best Kept Linguistic Secret - Documentary on the presence of St. Lucian French-lexicon Creole speakers in Guyana” (2004), with two other documentaries (see below for blurbs).The films will be shown in the AV room on the 3rd floor of the Main Library, from 12 noon - 4 p.m. Prof Robertson’s documentary will be shown again on the afternoon of Thursday 29th  with two other films, one Martiniquan and one Haitian. Ms Sandra Evans, Lecturer in French-lexicon Creole, will be the hostess.   

 

JOUNEN KWÉYÒL ENTENNASYONNAL - INTERNATIONAL CREOLE/PATOIS DAY (28 ÒKTÒB/OCTOBER 2009) - FILM AFTERNOON

1) Guyana's Best Kept Linguistic Secret - Documentary on the presence of St. Lucian French-lexicon Creole speakers in Guyana. Dir. Ian Robertson, 2004. 

This video documents the presence of St. Lucian French-lexicon Creole speakers in Guyana. There is a thin narrative thread to the accounts presented by a significant few members of this migrant community. By their own accounts, their presence in Guyana has been ongoing from the early twentieth century. The presentation indicates that the migrants continued the vibrant use of their Creole language and even pass it on into the third generation.  

 

2) C'est Quitte: The French Creoles of Trinidad - A documentary film on the influence of French culture on the life and history of Trinidad.  Dir. Alex de Verteuil , 2004 (59 mins). 

From the high green hills of Paramin overlooking Port-of-Spain, to the dappled shade of a Tortuga cocoa estate, this documentary records with intelligence and insight the influence of French culture on the life and history of Trinidad.  Interviews with the descendants of French Creole planters and with eminent Trinidadians such as Sir Ellis Clarke, first President of the Republic, and historian Father Anthony de Verteuil are interspersed with rare archival photographs to give an intimate portrayal of this pivotal aspect of Trinidad's history.  The role of the Catholic church, of the French and Patois (Creole) languages, of educational institutions, of family values and the impact of racism, prejudice and cultural stereotypes are discussed frankly and fairly, as the camera roams from the living rooms of heritage houses to the streets and markets of Trinidad.  This is essential viewing for anyone wishing to gain deeper understanding of the social and cultural fabric of Trinidad & Tobago. 

 

3) JAB: The Blue Devils of Paramin.  Dir. Alex de Verteuil, 2006 (46 mins) 

Isolated in the mountains of Trinidad, the district of Paramin once a year at Carnival time sheds its rural languor and erupts into an inferno of  blue-painted 'jabs' or devils. This 46-minute documentary, filmed in the two weeks leading up to Carnival, follows Kootoo, King Devil, as he prepares with his three brothers to once again win the village competition for the most convincing devil band.  Known for his athletic prowess, and given to extraordinary feats like ripping up trees and scaling tall buildings, the charismatic Kootoo must still work hard with his band of  devils to win the prize in the face of serious competition from a new generation of ‘jabs’.  Will the brothers’ scheme to add a new twist to the masquerade be enough for them to win?  Told by the villagers themselves, in their own languages, this entertaining story highlights the joyous heart of Paramin.  With its CD-worthy background music of folk-songs and calypsos, JAB sheds light on a Caribbean culture that few visitors ever get to see.

 

Open to: | Staff | Student |


CONTACT

  • Jo-Anne Ferreira, Lecturer in Linguistics and Secretary-Treasurer, Society for Caribbean Linguistics

  • Tel.: (868)-662-2002 ext.3029
  • Email: jo-anne.ferreira@sta.uwi.edu