Course Code:                 SOCI 1002

Course Title:                  Introduction to Sociology I

Level:                            1

Semester:                      1

No. of Credits:                3

Pre-requisite(s):             None

 

 

Lecturer: Dr. Bennie Berkeley (Day)

Class: Monday 12:00noon – 2:00pm

Venue: Daaga Lecture Theatre

Email: Bennie.Berkeley@sta.uwi.edu

Telephone: 662-2002 ext 83656/83654

………………………………………………………………………………………………

Lecturer: Dr. Bennie Berkeley (Evening)

Class: Monday 5:00pm – 7:00pm

Venue: JFK Lecture Theatre

Email: Bennie.Berkeley@sta.uwi.edu

………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

South Campus Lecturer: Mr. Anand Rampersad

Class: Monday 5.00pm-7.00pm

Venue: Naparima College

Email: pastiche6@yahoo.com

 

 

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the fascinating discipline of sociology.

The course is divided into three sections.

  • Section One introduces students to the theories and methods in sociology.
  • Section Two focuses on structures of social stratification.
  • Section Three deals with the study of selected social institutions (namely family, education, religion and politics).

The topics covered will be discussed in much greater depth in other sociology courses.

 

ATTENDANCE GUIDELINES AND POLICY

  • The use of electronic devices is strictly prohibited during these lectures and tutorials.
  • There will be one two-hour lecture per week.
  • Students are also required to attend one tutorial per week.
  • Students are encouraged strongly to participate in the tutorial discussions as well as  essay preparation.
  • Tutorials are not substitutes for lectures.
  • Students will be allowed to sit the final examination in this course only if they have attended a minimum of 75% of lectures and a minimum of 75% of tutorials.
  • Kindly observe all guidelines with respect to eating and drinking in lecture rooms.
  • Students are expected to observe all classroom protocols e.g. respect for others etc.

 

ASSESSMENT:

  1. Course Work (30%)
  • Two in-tutorial multiple choice quizzes each carrying 20% (10% each).
  • One oral presentation carrying 10%.

 

FURTHER EXPLANATION IS PROVIDED ON PP 6-8

 

  1. Final Examination - 70%
  • This will consist of one two-hour examination at the end of the semester. The exam would be divided into three sections as follows:.
  • Section I (20%) is COMPULSORY and will comprise forty (40) objective type items; (20 Multiple Choice questions, 15 TRUE or FALSE and 5 Matching Items.)
  • Section II (25%) is COMPULSORY and will comprise one structured question with five (5) parts.
  • Section III (25%)-consists of four (4) essay questions and you will be required to answer only ONE (1)

 

LECTURE TOPICS

 

SECTION I

BASIC CONCEPTS, THEORIES AND METHODS

Week 1

The Nature of Sociology:

  • What is sociology?
  • The branches of sociology
  • The origin and development of sociology
  • Sociology as a science: Positivist, Phenomenologist, Realist and Post modernist views

Week 2

Sociological Perspectives:

  • Functionalist
  • Marxist 

Week 3

Sociological Perspectives:

  • Social Action-Weber’s
  • Interpretivist - SI, Phenomenology and Ethnomethodology

Week 4

Sociological ResearchMethods

  • Quantitative methods-surveys (questionnaires and structured interviews)
  • Qualitative methods: participant observation and case studies
  • Secondary sources: official statistics, and documents

 

SECTION II

SOCIAL& GLOBAL STRATIFICATION

Week 5

 Class-based theories of Social Stratification

  • Types of Stratification systems- ‘Open’ vs. ‘Closed’
  • Types and Patterns of Social Mobility

Week 6

Theories of Social Stratification

  • Marxist
  • Neo-Marxist

Week 7

Theories of Social Stratification

  • Weber’s
  • Neo-Weberian

Week 8

Theories of Social Stratification

  • Functionalist
  • Post Modern

 

 

SECTION III

SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Week 9

Family

  • Sociological Perspectives of the Family-functionalist, feminist and post modernist
  • Family Structures in the Caribbean -Nuclear, single-Parent and Extended
  • Forms of Marital Breakup

Week 10

Religion

  • Sociological Perspectives of Religion-functionalist, Marxist, phenomenological (emphasis on secularization)
  • Religious Organizations-churches, sects and cults
  • Syncretism and Caribbean religious forms

Week 11

Education

  • Sociological Perspectives of Education-functionalist , Marxist and  interactionist
  • Education and Social Change/Modernization

Week 12

Political

  • Theories of  the State-functionalist, Marxist and Pluralist
  • Theories of Social Movement-relative deprivation, rational choice, resource mobilization, political opportunity

 

 

Essential Texts:

 

Barrow, C. and Reddock, R. Caribbean Sociology: Introductory Readings, Kingston: Ian Randle, 2001. (Useful for Caribbean based studies)

Giddens, A. 2001 Sociology, Cambridge, UK: Polity Press./Introduction to Sociology(available at UWI Bookstore)

 

Mustapha, N. Sociology for Caribbean Students, Society and Culture, Mona, Jamaica: Ian Randle Publishers, 2006. (Useful for Caribbean studies)

Haralambos, M and Holborn, M. (2009) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives, London: Collins.

Recommended Texts:

Barrow, C., Family in the Caribbean, Kingston: Ian Randle, 1996.

Craig, S. (Ed.) Contemporary Caribbean: A Sociological Reader, Vols I and II, 1981.

Deosaran, R., Reddock, R. and Mustapha, N. (Eds.) Contemporary Issues in Social Science: A Caribbean Perspective, Vols. I-III, UWI, St Augustine: Psychological Research Centre, 1994, 1995 and 1996.

Giddens, A. Sociology: A Brief but Critical Introduction, London, Macmillan, 1986. 1. Miller, E.,

Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean, UWI, Mona: ISER, 1991.

Mustapha, N. and Brunton, R. Issues in Education in Trinidad and Tobago, UWI School of Continuing Studies, 2002.

Ryan, S., Social and Occupational Stratification in Contemporary Trinidad and Tobago, Trinidad: ISER, 1996.

Tischler, H.L., 2002 Introduction to Sociology, 6th Edition, Texas: The Harcourt Press.

Worsley, P. 1987The New Introducing Sociology, Harmondsworth: Penguin.

 

 

WHAT TUTORS AND STUDENTS SHOULD KNOW

INFORMATION FOR TUTORS AND STUDENTS

  1. Tutors are NOT expected to lecture; their main role is to guide students in discussion.
  2. Tutors are expected to teach and /or demonstrate good essay writing skills and habits e.g. how to plan, evaluate, discuss, assess etc.
  3. Students will take responsibility for making oral presentations in each tutorial. (This means you are not supposed to read an entire presentation)
  4. Students will be invited to volunteer topics for presentation. If not tutors are expected to assign them. This should be done on or before the conclusion of the second tutorial.
  5. Tutors will keep an attendance register for each tutorial session.
  6. The questions listed below will be used to guide the discussions of each tutorial.
  7. Tutors should send written (email) or oral feedback to the lecturer on student progress.
  8. Students with on  medical, bereavement or any other type of leave or prolonged absence should provide formal certification or evidence to tutors and the department/Dean’s office if necessary (e.g. doctor’s note  or death certificate etc.)

 

INFORMATION ABOUT COURSE WORK

  1. The Multiple Choice Test

 

  1. Students are expected to take the multiple choice tests on the day and time of their tutorial.
  2. Each test will comprise 20 multiple choice questions (evaluating critical thinking skills and knowledge of content).
  3. Tests will be of 15minutes duration.
  4. This multiple choice test should be administered during the first 15 minutes of the tutorial; leaving the remainder of time for class discussion of tutorial topics listed below.
  5. Tutors will set and administer the tests during their tutorial sessions. However, questions will be vetted by the lecturer at least one week before the test.
  6. Tutors are responsible for obtaining copies of the test from the department of Behavioural Sciences.
  7. Tutors are expected to set the test by formulating multiple choice questions that encourage critical thinking (simple knowledge questions are not expected).
  8. Tutors will record all marks.
  9. Marked scripts should be distributed to students within one week after a test.
  10. Students who missed a test will be awarded zero unless a sound/authentic medical certificate is produced.
  11. A hard copy of all marks must be submitted to the lecturer before the tutorial following the test.

 

 

DATES FOR COURSE WORK TESTS AND PRESENTATIONS

Assessment

Date

What will be tested

1 Test

Week 5: October 1-6, 2012

20 multiple choice questions based on topics 1 and 2

2 Test

Week 7: October 15-20, 2012

20 multiple choice questions based on topics 3 and 4

3 Oral Presentation

Weeks 8-12: October 22-November 24, 2012

 

Topics 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11

 

  1. The oral presentation
  • Each student will make several class presentations.(However, the one with the highest

     mark will contribute towards course marks)

  • No late presentations will be accepted.
  • Students should be informed of their presentation mark not long after its completion

     (based on tutor discretion)

  • Presentations will be marked out of 10 using the following rubric:

 

Table 1: Criteria for Marking Oral Presentations

 

Criterion

Excellent  (2)

Average (1)

 

Below Average (½)

Total

Content (6)

Of great relevance

Moderate relevance

 Of little relevance

 ___×3=

Structure (2)

Extremely well ordered and organized

Satisfactorily well organized

Poorly organized

____×1=

Originality (2)

Very creative use of devices such as cards, charts etc.

Satisfactory- use of some aid to enhance presentation was attempted

Uninspiring-too much repetition, no aids to support presentation

_____×1=

Total Mark

 

 

 

___out of 10

 

    (Kindly round off all marks to whole numbers)

 

TOPICS FOR TUTORIAL DISCUSSION

NB: Tutors can assign and test additional topics as necessary.

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION

TOPIC I: The Origin and Development of Sociology

 (1) The Nature and Usefulness of Sociology

 (a) Assess the claim that sociology is not a natural science like biology, chemistry or physics.     (Weigh up the evidence from the different competing claims)

 (b) Discuss the social sciences by focusing on their similarities, differences, strengths and weaknesses. (Your answer should explain sociology, psychology, anthropology and political science)

Readings:

Giddens, A. (1996) Sociology. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Haralambos, M. & Holborn, (2009) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives. London: Collins.  (Use latest edition)

TOPIC II: Sociological perspectives (Functionalism and Marxism)

(c) Compare and contrast the main theoretical positions or assumptions of Emile Durkheim and Talcott Parsons to the development of the functionalist perspective in sociology.

(d) Critically appraise the Marxist perspective of sociology and comment on its relevance to our understanding of class relations today.

Readings:

Giddens, A. Sociology. Cambridge: Polity, Chapter 1.

Giddens, A. Sociology: A brief but critical Introduction.

Haralambos, M. & Holborn (2009) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives. London: Collins.

 

 

TOPIC III: Sociological Perspectives (Micro-perspectives)

Readings:

 

(e) Discuss the main assumptions of the Social Action and symbolic interactionist perspectives in sociology. (This involves outlining the main assumptions and then explaining their main strengths and limitations)

(f) Critically assessthe phenomenological and ethnomethodological perspectives used in sociology.

 

Cuff and Sharrock (1999) New Perspectives in Sociology. London: George Allen and Unwin.

Giddens, A. (1996) Sociology. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Haralambos and Holborn (2000) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives. London: Collins.

Ritzer, G. Sociological Theory. Abbot, P. & Wallace, C. (1990) An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Pers-pectives. London: Routledge, Chs. 2 and 6, (pp. 16-46); (pp. 121-150).

Greene, J.E. (ed.) (1993) Race, Class and Gender in the Future of the Caribbean. Kingston, Jamaica: ISER.

Miller, E. (1991) Men at Risk. Kingston, Jamaica: Jamaica Publishing House.

Wiltshire-Brodber, R. (1986) “Gender, Race, and Class in the Caribbean” in P. Mohammed and C. Shepherd (eds.), Gender in Caribbean Development, St. Augustine, Trinidad: ISER.

Reddock, R. (1994) “’Douglarisation’ and the Politics of Gender in Contemporary Trinidad and Tobago: a preliminary exploration” in R. Deosaran, R. Reddock and N. Mustapha (eds.), Contemporary Issues in Social Science: a Caribbean Perspective. St. Augustine, Trinidad: McAl Psychological Research Centre.

 

TOPIC IV: Sociological Research Methods and Designs

 

(g) Outline and evaluate the usefulness of the main quantitative research methods used in social science research. (You should focus on issues of validity, reliability and reliability)

(h)  Critically appraise the the main qualitative research methods used in sociology science research in terms of their validity and reliability and practicality.

Readings:

Bailey, P.  Methods of Social Research

Burgess, R. (1984) In the Field. London: Allen and Unwin.

Giddens, A. (1996) Sociology. Cambridge: Polity, Ch. 21.

Tischler, H.L. (1999) Introduction to Sociology. Texas: The Harcourt Press.

Haralambos and Holborn (2000) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives. London: Collins.

 

SECTION II: SOCIAL STRATIFICATION

TOPIC V: Types/Forms of Stratification

(i) Differentiate between closed and open stratification systems in terms of social groups, life chances, occupations and culture in general (giving examples of each)

(j)Does social mobility lead to an ‘open’ and meritocratic society? (Cite examples of mobility studies in the contemporary times in the Caribbean and elsewhere and comment on their effectiveness in changing the social order)

Readings:

Beckford, G. (1972) Persistent Poverty. New York: Oxford University Press.

Brathwaite, L. (1975) “Social Stratification in Trinidad.” Reprinted from SES: 2:2 and 3, pp. 5-175.

Deosaran, R. (1995) Cultural Diversity. St. Augustine, Trinidad: UWI, McAl Psychological Research Centre

Reddock, R. (1995) Contemporary Issues in Social Sciences, Vol. II.

Ryan, S. (ed.) (1991) Social and Occupational Stratification in Con-temporary Trinidad and Tobago. St. Augustine, Trinidad, ISER.

Smith, M.G. Culture, Race and Class in the Commonwealth Caribbean. St. Augustine, Trinidad: UWI, Extra Mural Studies.

Clarke, C. (1986) East Indians in a West Indian Town. London: Allen and Unwin.

Greene, J.E. (ed.) (1993) Race, Class and Gender in the Future of the Caribbean. Jamaica: ISER.

Klass, M. (1961/88) East Indians in Trinidad: a Study of Cultural Persistence. Prospect Heights, Waveland Press.

Ryan, S. (ed.) (1991) Social and Occupational Stratification in Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad: ISER.

Smith, M.G. (1984) Culture, Race and Class in the Commonwealth Caribbean. Mona, Jamaica: Dept. of Extra Mural Studies, UWI.

Yelvington, K. (ed.) (1993) Trinidad Ethnicity. London: Macmillan.

Haralambos and Holborn (2000) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives. London: Collins.

 

TOPIC VI: Theories of Stratification

(g) Compare and contrast Marx and Weber’s theories of stratification

(h) Explain the different ways in which neo-Marxists have attempted to improve the stratification theory of Karl Marx.

 

Topic VII: Theories of Social Stratification

(i) Outline and assess the main theoretical assumptions of the functionalist and post modernist perspectives of social stratification.

(j) To what extent would you say that social inequality today would be best explained using a combination of class, race/ethnicity and gender arguments?

Readings:

A. Webster Introduction to the Sociology of Development, 2nd Edition, Chapters 3 and 4.

A. Giddens Sociology, Chapter 16.

P. Worsley The New Introducing Sociology, Chapter 2

M. Blomstrom & Development Theory in Transition, Zed

Bjorn Hettne Books, London, 1988, Chapters 1, 3 and 5

A. Giddens Sociology: A Brief but Critical Introduction, Chapter 7

Ian Roxborough            Theories of Underdevelopment, Macmillan, 1979

Alex Thio Sociology: An Introduction, Chapter 23.

 

SECTION III: SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND SOCIAL PROCESSES

TOPIC VIII: the Sociology of Family

(o) Discuss the main features of the functionalist and Marxist perspectives of the family.

(p) Outline and critically appraise the main economic, cultural and political factors that account for the diversity of family structures in the Caribbean.

Readings:

Barrow, C. (1996) Family in the Caribbean. Jamaica: Ian Randle Publishers.

Klass, M. (1961) East Indians in Trinidad: a Study of Cultural Persistence. Prospect Heights, Illinois: Waveland Press.

Reddock, R. (1994) “’Douglarisation’ and the Politics of Gender in Contemporary Trinidad and Tobago: a preliminary exploration” in R. Deosaran, R. Reddock and N. Mustapha (eds.), Contemporary Issues in Social Science: a Caribbean Perspective. St. Augustine, Trinidad: McAl Psychological Research Centre.

Chevannes, Barry (2002) “If the Shoe Doesn’t Fit: Law and the African Caribbean

Family” Journal of Eastern Caribbean Studies, Vol. 27, No. 2

Rodman, Hyman (1971) Lower Class Families: The Culture of Poverty in Negro

Trinidad, Oxford University Press, London

Smith, M. G. (1962) West Indian Family Structure, University of Washington Press,

Seattle and London

Smith, R. T. (1956) The Negro Family in British Guiana: Family Structure and social

Status in the Villages, Routledge and Kegan Paul, London

 

TOPIC IX: The Sociology of Education

(q) Explain the main differences between the functionalist perspective of education, and the Marxist and Interactionist perspectives of education.

(r) With the use of relevant examples justify the arguments for and against the proposition that formal education reduces all forms of social inequality.

Readings:

Baksh, I.J. (1986) “Education and Equality of Opportunity in Trinidad and Tobago.” Caribbean Journal of Education, Vol. 13.

Campbell, C. Colony and Nation: A Short History of Education. Jamaica: Ian Randle Publishers.

Figueroa, M.E. * Persaud, G. Sociology of Education: A Caribbean Reader.

Giddens, A. Sociology. Chap. 13.

Miller, E. (1991) Education and Society in the Commonwealth Caribbean. Mona, Jamaica: ISER.

Mustapha, N. (2002) “Education and Stratification in Trinidad and Tobago” in Mustapha, N. and Brunton, R. (Eds.), Issues in Education in Trinidad and Tobago, UWI, SOCS, 2002

 

Topic X: Sociology of Religion

(s) Discuss the main assumptions of the functionalist and Marxist perspectives of religion.

(t) Assess the arguments for and against secularization.

Readings

Beckford, J. New Religious Movements and Rapid Social Change.

Bisnauth, D. History of Religions in the Caribbean.

Gossai,H. & Samuel,N.,(ed.)(2000) Religion, Culture and Tradition in the Caribbean.

MacMillan. 

Rajkumar, J. (1993) A Comparative Study of Voodoo in Haiti and Shango in Trinidad Caribbean Studies Thesis.

Simpson, G. Religious Cults in the Caribbean.

Vertovec, S.A. Hindu Trinidad.

See also papers from UWI Workshop on Caribbean Religions, August 16-18, 1996.

Conference in “Religion of the new World” U.W.I., St. Augustine. Jan. 2002. (see West Indiana).