Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Technology

Short Description

 

This programme is a collaborative offering between the Department of Physics and the Faculty of Medical Sciences. The B.Sc. Biomedical Technology, BMET, is a valuable option that prepares graduates with a combination of key theoretical and practical skills to work in the biomedical technology field. It introduces the aspects of physics and instrumentation, statistics, medical sciences, and international regulatory standards.  The inclusion of the various subject areas brings together experts from multiple disciplines which would support the goal of producing a graduate who exemplifies the qualities given in the University's strategic plan. Students graduating from this programme would have the quantitative and analytical skills necessary to undertake a range of biomedical instrumentation and management careers in industry, government and non-government organizations. Graduates would be excellent candidates to continue on to graduate studies in pursuit of advanced degrees in M.Sc. in Biomedical Physics.

 

The B.Sc. in BMET is a multidisciplinary field of study incorporating disciplines such as: Physics, Biology, Medicine, Mathematics, and Engineering. The inclusion of relevant aspects of all these disciplines allows students of the programme to be guided by experts from the various disciplines, thus providing an enabling and engaging environment for the students of the programme to develop qualities, skills and competencies to be a distinctive UWI graduate. The proposed programme is tailored to serve both a market and the individuals pursuing the programme, and is in keeping with the UWI’s vision of providing high quality education directed towards regional developmental needs. The programme will also provide students the opportunity for real work experience through a project/internship period.

 

Aims and Objectives

The programme’s aim is to prepare students for careers in the biomedical industry or for further education at the postgraduate level. The objectives of the new B.Sc. in Biomedical Technology are to:

  • Produce a graduate with the technical, scientific, and communication skills for the understanding, operation, repair and maintenance, and interpretation of resulting signals and images from medical instrumentation in the health and allied health services systems.
  • Provide graduates with highly marketable specialist skills in the technological aspects of biomedical technology.
  • Produce professionals capable of providing expert advice and consultancy to health administrators on the types and sensitivity of medical instrumentation required as well as recommendations for sourcing and procurement of equipment.
  • Produce professionals who will be capable of becoming a Certified Biomedical Equipment Technician (CBET), and/or a Certified Laboratory Equipment Specialist (CLES), which are certifications offered by the International Certification Commission for Clinical Engineering and Biomedical Technology.
  • Prepare graduates who are capable of pursuing an advanced degree program at the postgraduate level in science, engineering, or business.

 

Entry Requirements

 

Admission to the program would require candidates to have passes in two (2) CAPE science subjects including Physics (Minimum Average Grade II) OR An approved Associate Degree with a minimum GPA of 2.75 or equivalent.

 

BSc BioMedical Physics Outline

 

Programme of study

The duration of the programme will be 3 years. Students will be required to complete 24 credits at Level 1, 60 credits at Levels II & III (54 credits from BMET courses and 6 elective credits) and 9 credits of foundation courses.

 

B.Sc. Biomedical Technology (93 CREDITS)

LEVEL I (all are core courses)

 

Semester I

PHYS 1221              Introduction to Mechanics

PHYS 1222              Introduction to Optics, Oscillations and Waves

BMET 1004              Introductory Human Anatomy and Physiology I

MATH 1115              Fundamental Mathematics for the General Sciences I

Semester II

PHYS 1223              Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism

PHYS 1224              Introduction to Thermodynamics and Modern Physics

BMET 1005              Introductory Human Anatomy and Physiology II

MATH 1125              Fundamental Mathematics for the General Sciences II

 

LEVEL II

Semester I

BIOL 2163                Biostatistics

BMET 2002              Introduction to Medical Physics

PHYS 2402              Digital Circuits and Logic Design

PHYS 3160 *            Medical Physics and Bioengineering Laboratory

PHYS 3163              Electronics Laboratory

PHYS 3167              Radiation Biophysics and Medicine

PHYS 2150              Mathematics for Physicists

ELECTIVE ***

 

Semester II

BMET 2001              Bioengineering

PHYS 2401              Optoelectronics

PHYS 3160 *            Medical Physics and Bioengineering Laboratory

PHYS 3203              Microprocessor and Modern Digital Design

PHYS 3163              Electronics Laboratory

PHYS 3168              Medical Instrumentation

ELECTIVE ***

 

LEVEL III

Semester I

PHYS 3201               Advance Electronics and Control Theory

BMET 3000 * ǂ           Biomedical Technology Project

BMET 3001 ǂ                 Laboratory Management and Practice

ELECTIVE ***

 

Semester II

BMET 3000 * ǂ           Biomedical Technology Project

BMET 3002               Light and Optics in Medicine

BMET 3003 ǂ             Biomedical Technology Laboratory Course

BMET 3004 ǂ             Metrology and Regulatory Standards

ELECTIVE ***

 

* Yearlong

ǂ Check Faculty booklet for Course Availability

 

ELECTIVES *** (6 credits)

Students may pursue elective courses (6 credits) from the Department of Physics and other Departments provided that they have the necessary pre-requisites and with the head of Department’s approval.

 

 

LEVEL I COURSES

 

LEVEL: I
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: BMET 1004
COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTORY HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: NONE

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

It is essential that biotechnology personnel, in any form of the use of the body, should be more than merely acquainted with the human body and the relationship of its parts to the total working of the healthy person. Scientific background will underscore student opportunities to think critically, from the perspective of the human organism functioning independently, the interface between the individual and his/her immediate environment, including interactive relationships with technology, and global environment. This course integrates several disciplines including the basic gross anatomy and histology of all the system, as well as physiology of the human body. Contemporaneous issues of homeostasis, ergonomics, adaptation and health will be discussed in the context of today's emerging environmental and inter-organism impacts in the quality of life. This course comprises of: General Introduction of Gross anatomy, concepts and principles of cell biology; histology; the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems; special senses; and the endocrine system. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments, in-course laboratory exercises and a final examination.

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LEVEL: I
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: BMET 1005
COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTORY HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: NONE

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Introductory Human Anatomy and Physiology II is an extension of its first semester counterpart Introductory Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Introductory Human Anatomy & Physiology II offers a broad overview of the structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) of tissues, organs and organ systems.  The systems covered in this course are: heart, blood and circulatory system; the lymphatic system, immune System and disease; the digestive System and nutrition; the excretory System, kidneys and fluid balance; and the respiratory system, lungs and respiration. The course concludes with human reproductive anatomy and physiology. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments, in-course laboratory exercises and a final examination.

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LEVEL: I
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: PHYS 1221
COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

CAPE PHYSICS (UNITS I AND II) OR

CAPE MATHEMATICS (UNITS I AND II) AND

CSEC (CXC) PHYSICS OR PHYS 0070 AND PHYS 0071 OR

THEIR EQUIVALENT

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is designed to introduce the students to topics in Mechanics. This subject is a stepping stone to understanding the world and many of the new technologies being developed today. Additionally, experimentation, observation and recording skills are essential for Physics. For this reason the topics covered address Newtonian Mechanics including: kinematics, laws of motion, work and energy, systems of particles, momentum, circular motion, oscillations, and gravitation and concludes with topics in fluid mechanics. Through in-class discussions, problem-solving sessions and practical sessions, the student will have the opportunity to improve his/her ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical world using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions. 

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LEVEL: I
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: PHYS 1222
COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO OPTICS, OSCILLATION AND WAVES
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

CAPE PHYSICS (UNITS I AND II) OR

CAPE MATHEMATICS (UNITS I AND II) AND

CSEC (CXC) PHYSICS OR PHYS 0070 AND PHYS 0071 OR

THEIR EQUIVALENT

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is designed to introduce the student to topics in the fundamentals of Optics, Oscillations and Waves. Understanding Physics is crucial to the study of all sciences. Additionally, experimentation, observation and recording skills are essential for Physics. Physics is the study of matter, energy, space and time and gaining a better understanding of this subject is a stepping stone to understanding the world and many of the new technologies being developed today. The theoretical aspect of this course provides students with the fundamentals of Optics, Oscillations and Waves whereas the practical component allows all the Year I students to be exposed to a variety of techniques, concepts and skills in the experimental sciences. Through in-class discussion, problem solving sessions and practical exercises students will have the opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical world using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions.

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LEVEL: I
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: PHYS 1223
COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICITY & MAGNETISM
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

CAPE PHYSICS (UNITS I AND II) OR

CAPE MATHEMATICS (UNITS I AND II) AND

CSEC (CXC) PHYSICS OR PHYS 0070 AND PHYS 0071 OR

THEIR EQUIVALENT

  

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is designed to introduce you to topics in Electricity and Magnetism. Understanding Physics is crucial to the study of all sciences. Physics is the study of matter, energy, space and time and gaining a better understanding of this subject is a stepping stone to understanding the world and many of the new technologies being developed today. This course required the use of Calculus, Vector analysis and Complex variable theory to understand the basic concepts of Electricity, Magnetism and AC theory. Through in-class discussion, problem-solving sessions and practical sessions, the student will have the opportunity to improve his/her ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical world using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions.

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LEVEL: I
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: PHYS 1224
COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO THERMODYNAMICS & MODERN PHYSICS
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

CAPE PHYSICS (UNITS I AND II) OR

CAPE MATHEMATICS (UNITS I AND II) AND

CSEC (CXC) PHYSICS OR PHYS 0070 AND PHYS 0071 OR

THEIR EQUIVALENT

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is designed to introduce the student to topics in the fundamentals of Thermodynamics and Modern Physics. Understanding Physics is crucial to the study of all sciences. Experimentation. Observation and recording skills are essential for Physics. Physics is the study of matter, energy, space and time and gaining a better understanding of this subject is a stepping stone to understanding the world and many of the new technologies being developed today. The theoretical aspect of this course provides students with the fundamentals of Thermodynamics and Modern Physics whereas the practical component allows all the Year 1 students to be exposed to a variety of techniques, concepts and skills in the experimental sciences. Through in-class discussion, problem solving sessions and practical exercises students will have the opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical world using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions.

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LEVEL: I
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: MATH 1115
COURSE TITLE: FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS FOR THE GENERAL SCIENCES I
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: NONE

 

NB: Students with any two units of Cape Level Mathematics (or equivalent), AGRI 1003 (Mathematics for Scientists) and/or MATH 0100 (Pre-Calculus) will not receive credits for this course.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Algebra: Types of numbers, scientific notation, precision and accuracy, manipulating numbers, factorials, inequalities, simultaneous equations, indices, partial fractions, quadratic equations, remainder theorem, solving polynomial equations. Functions: Logarithms, exponentials, inverse functions. Trigonometry: Trigonometric functions and their graphs, common identities, solution of trigonometric equations.

Coordinate Geometry: gradients and intercepts, extrapolation techniques, linear regression. Statistics: Introduction to descriptive statistics, frequency distribution, mean, median, mode and standard deviation, measures of central tendency, normal and binomial distributions, chi-squared test. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: I
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: MATH 1125
COURSE TITLE: FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS FOR THE GENERAL SCIENCES II
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: CSEC MATHEMATICS (OR EQUIVALENT) OR MATH 1115

                

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Differentiation: Functions of a single real variable, polynomials, exponentials and basic trigonometric functions. Product, quotient and function of a function' rules. Implicit differentiation. Finding and classifying stationary points. Basic curve sketching for quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Application to velocity, acceleration, deceleration, distance traveled. Calculating rates of change. Basic rules for partial differentiation for functions of more than one real variable. Taylor series for a function of a single real variable. Limits: Concept of a limit. Evaluation of basic limits.

Errors: precision of calculations, round-off errors. Integration: Definition as reverse of differentiation. Definite integrals and areas under curves. Integration by substitution (u=f(x)), integration by parts, integration by partial fractions. Calculation of work done. Differential Equations (Topic to be motivated by models of physical systems): First order separable and linear equations. Second order linear with constant coefficients - complementary functions and particular integrals. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL II/III COURSES

 

 

LEVEL: II
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: BIOL 2163
COURSE TITLE: BIOSTATISTICS
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

MATH 1115 or MATH 1125 or AGRI 1003 or

Unit I or II CAPE Pure Mathematics or

Unit I or II CAPE Applied Maths or

Cambridge GCE A’level Mathematics or

A/O’ Level Add Maths or equivalent and

9 Credits of Level 1 Life Sciences courses chosen from the following

BIOL1262 Living Organisms I, BIOL1263 Living Organisms II,

BIOL1364 Genetics I, BIOL1362 Biochemistry I,

BIOL1261 Diversity of Organisms and

BIOL1061 Cell Biology and Genetics

              

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Biostatistics plays an important role in the analysis of data in the field of medical diagnostics. One such role is in the calibration of instrumentation. Incorrectly calibrated medical instrumentation may have direct adverse consequences on an individual's life and in many instances plays a critical role in life-death cases. This course focuses on the statistics involved in the calibration of medical instrumentation. The course comprises: descriptive statistics; types of measurement errors including zero drift, sensitivity drift; measurement uncertainty; probability distributions; point estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests for means, proportions, rates, rate ratios; analysis of variance; correlation and regression; goodness-of-fit tests; multiple regression; logistic regression; inverse regression; calibration curves; case studies to medical devices. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: II
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: BMET 2001
COURSE TITLE: BIOENGINEERING
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1111 OR PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212,

PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 and PHYS 1216 OR

PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 and PHYS 1224

                  

COURSE DESCRIPTION::

This course will emphasize a systemic view of human anatomy, hierarchy of structures, the function of the various systems of the body and an introduction to selected physiological functions in the human body. Additionally, the physics of the human body will be addressed in terms of the generation of electricity and the use of biopotential measurements in medical diagnostics. This course will focus on the following: Review of radiation interaction with matter; Medical radiation sources and their applications in diagnosis and therapy (focus on detectors, scanners and image processing in the medical environment); Nuclear medicine: radioisotopes, tracer studies and system modeling; Biomechanics as applied in orthopaedic and cardiac surgery; Biomaterials: focusing on the properties of implantable materials and their preparation for implantation; Kinetic and blood flow studies. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: II
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: BMET 2002
COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL PHYSICS
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1111 OR PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212,

PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 and PHYS 1216 OR

PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 and PHYS 1224

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The Medical Physics section of this course will focus on radiation diagnostic methods, corresponding equipment and image analysis in medicine in addition to the production and use of different radiation types for diagnosis and cancer therapy.  While in the Bioengineering section, human movement analysis, the development of prostheses and orthoses, the use of man-made materials in the human body, fluid flow and tracer techniques for diagnosis will be considered. This course will focus on the following: The structure, function, properties and Physics of bone, muscles, cardiovascular and nervous system. Feedback and Control systems in the body and homeostatis. Biomedical potentials, electrooculogram (EOG), electrocardiogram (ECG), electromyogram (EMG), electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetocardiogram (MCG). The visual system and the auditory system. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: II
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: PHYS 2150
COURSE TITLE: MATHEMATICS FOR PHYSICISTS
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1111 OR PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212,

PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 and PHYS 1216 OR

PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 and PHYS 1224

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Probability and Statistics: Introduction to probability, Methods of counting, Conditional probability, Distribution functions, Sampling theory, Applications in Physics; Cartesian and Curvilinear Coordinate Systems; Vector Analysis; Complex Variable Theory; Fourier Series Analysis; Differential Equations (up to second order); and Applications of these methods in Physics. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: II
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: PHYS 2402
COURSE TITLE: DIGITAL CIRCUITS AND LOGIC DESIGN
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 2401 or PHYS 2163

                    

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of digital electronic and logic circuit design. It covers basics of digital electronic i.e. logic gates, Boolean algebra, logic minimization & implementation, logic families, number systems, binary codes and binary arithmetic. Combinational and sequential logic circuit design fundamentals are explained along with their applications. Various type of registers and counters along with design steps and applications are also covered in this course. As such it provides building blocks for the other courses in particular the course on Modern Digital Design and Microprocessor for which it is the prerequisite. Assessment and evaluation is done in the form of in-course tests and a Final examination.

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LEVEL: II
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: PHYS 2401
COURSE TITLE: OPTOELECTRONICS
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111 OR PHYS 1212 OR PHYS 1223

                   

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of analog electronics. It begins with semiconductor theory and its application to various electronic and optoelectronic devices. Semiconductor diodes, zener diodes and bipolar junction transistors, their types, construction, related theory, I/V characteristics, biasing techniques, ac/dc analysis and their applications are studied.  Optoelectronics related to devices/systems such as light emitting diodes, laser diodes, optical detectors, fiber-optics and solar cells are discussed along with applications.  The course provides the fundamentals for other electronics courses in particular the course on PHYS 3201 - Advance Electronics and Control Theory for which it is the prerequisite. Assessment and evaluation is done in the form of in-course tests and a final examination.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: (I & II) YEAR-LONG
COURSE CODE: PHYS 3160
COURSE TITLE: MEDICAL PHYSICS & BIOENGINEERING LABORATORY
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1111 OR PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212,

PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 and PHYS 1216 OR

PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 and PHYS 1224

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Laboratory experiments and a field trip with site work are to be performed corresponding to the taught components of the Medical Physics & Bioengineering elective. The students will be expected to perform the exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit the written report at the end of the exercise or submit it the following week for assessment. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: PHYS 3203
COURSE TITLE: MICROPROCESSOR AND MODERN DIGITAL DESIGN
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 2402 or PHYS 2162

                

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is one of the five courses that we offer at Physics Department as a part of the minor in Electronics and is an extension of the course Digital Circuits and Logic Design (PHYS 2402) taught in Semester I. The main objective is to build strong foundation for the students in the area of modern digital electronics and microprocessors fundamentals and to expose them to the entire digital systems design process from gate level to system level. An overview of advanced digital system design technologies and industrial grade Electronics Design and Automation (EDA) tools is provided to develop skilled manpower in the highly demanding area of System- On- Chip Design and to encourage entrepreneurship. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: (I & II) YEAR-LONG
COURSE CODE: PHYS 3163
COURSE TITLE: ELECTRONICS LABORATORY
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 2401 and PHYS 2402 or PHYS 2162 and PHYS 2163

                

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This laboratory course addresses the practical component of the Electronics Minor and covers all topic areas taught in four courses of the minor. This course provides the necessary practical knowledge in the field of basic as well as advance analog and digital electronics. The purpose of this laboratory course is to give students hands-on experience and to allow them to test the principles which they learn from the theoretical components of the courses. The students will be expected to perform the laboratory exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit the written report at the end of the exercise or submit it the following week for assessment.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: PHYS 3167
COURSE TITLE: RADIATION BIOPHYSICS AND MEDICINE
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1111 OR PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212,

PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 and PHYS 1216 OR

PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 and PHYS 1224

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The course addresses the interaction of ionizing radiation with living organisms including humans and the consequences of such interactions. Radiation Biology, Oncology, safety and protection are to be learned.

The course consists of several parts: Introduction to cell biology and DNA: this part of the course addresses cell structure, division and functioning, DNA as the main target for radiation, genetics, functioning of cell and damages caused by different types of radiation. Radiation damage and DNA repair. Cell death and mutation. Organ, tissue and organism effects of irradiation: This part of course addresses cell survival after irradiation and different biological and chemical mechanisms affecting the survival as well as DNA damage and repair. Tissue, organs and organism effects of irradiation. Here the key knowledge of radiation effects is learned.

Modern methods of radiotherapy: This part of course addresses the main principles, modern methods of radiotherapy and combined therapies as well as tumor biology and responses of tumor and of normal tissues to radiation. Radiation Carcinogenesis: This part of course addresses the development of cancer after radiation: type of malignancy, dosage, time responses and concepts of for risk estimations. Radiation protection and legislation: This part of course addresses radiation accidents, radioecology, risk estimation and current legislation in radiation (International and Local). What we have learned after certain accidents and how to avoid high radiation doses or to minimize the consequences of irradiation. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: PHYS 3168
COURSE TITLE: MEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1111 OR PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212,

PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 and PHYS 1216 OR

PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 and PHYS 1224

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The topics covered in this course address not only the principles, uses and design of medical devices, instrumentation and systems but also the various hardware, tools, and test equipment used in today’s medical environment. Through in-class discussions, problem-solving sessions and projects the student will be given the opportunity to improve the ability to reason through challenging situations in modern healthcare. The course consists of the following: Electronic Instruments: voltmeters e.g. VTVM Transistor voltmeter, multimeter, use of cathode-ray oscilloscope for the measurement of voltage, current phase and frequency, special purpose oscilloscopes, measurement of resistance, inductance, capacitance, using Kelvin’s, Maxwell’s and Schering bridge, measurement of effective resistance at high frequency, R meter, LCR meter. Signal generators, function generator, wave analyzer, harmonic distortion analyzer, spectrum analyzer, spectrum analysis. Transducers: operation of strain gauge, electromechanical transducer e.g. Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT), thermocouple, piezo- electric crystal, photoelectric transducers, light detecting resistor (LDR),  SQUID, thermistors. digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion techniques. Data Acquisition System for patient monitoring: recording equipment: types e.g. graphic, strip chart, magnetic tape, digital tape and requirements. Safety issues: Macro and micro current shock, special design from safety consideration, safety standards, testing, ensuring protection of equipment and personnel. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: PHYS 3201
COURSE TITLE: ADVANCE ELECTRONICS AND CONTROL THEORY
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 2401 or PHYS 2163

                  

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course deals with two major areas of electronics. First part deals with the advance analog electronics and covers the concept of feedback, feedback amplifiers, multivibrators, differential amplifiers, operational amplifiers; related theory and their applications. Second part deals with control theory and explores modeling, analysis and design of feedback control systems using classical approach. This course builds foundation for the course ECNG 3019 - Advance Control System Design and prepares students for automation industry.  This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: II
SEMESTER: I & II (YEARLONG)
COURSE CODE: BMET 3000
COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL PHYSICS
NO. OF CREDITS: 6
PREREQUISITES:

Minimum of 30 credits at the advanced level

                   

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The project will be compulsory for all biomedical technology majors and will consist of 6 hours/week of practical work and related required activities such as writing critiques of selected literature, training on equipment, attending and presenting interim reports verbally, meeting with supervisors. The student will be assigned a research project and will work under the guidance of a member of academic and/or technical staff. The student will be required to write a research proposal outlining the research project, a critical analysis of the literature and the methodology to be used. The student will plan and carry out experiments under the supervision of the advisor or professional recommended by the supervisor. On completion of the practical component, the student will be required to write a project report according to specified format. The report is to be submitted for assessment by a deadline set by the Department of Physics. Students will also be required to orally present their project to an open audience on dates set by the Department of Physics. The oral presentation should make use of current presentation technologies and technique and should be of ten minutes duration per student. This course will be assessed through a written report and an oral presentation.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: BMET 3003
COURSE TITLE: BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY COURSE
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1111 OR PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212,

PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 and PHYS 1216 OR

PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 and PHYS 1224

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Biomedical Technology is based on scientific principles which are tested by practical experimentation. In the process, the students are expected to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory.  The data obtained will have the inevitable systematic and random errors that obscure the relations between macroscopic observables of our sensory experience and the ideal laws that govern the phenomena.  Students will be challenged to learn how each of the experimental configurations work, to master its manipulation so as to obtain the best possible data set and then to interpret the data in light of theory and a quantitative assessment of the errors.  This course stresses data analysis in a laboratory setting. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: BMET 3001
COURSE TITLE: LABORATORY MANAGEMENT AND PRACTICE
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

Available only to B.Sc. Biomedical Technology

                 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Biomedical technologists may work within a laboratory environment and may be managers of a laboratory. Technologists may calibrate, test, sample, and evaluate various types of signals and materials and quantify results that may be used by other medical professionals for interpretation. One objective of laboratories is the achievement of documented processes and error-free results that are above reproach. Mistakes can lead to a lack of confidence in the results and services provided by a laboratory. Laboratories are designed, managed, and operated in a manner to consistently provide reliable services. This course provides an introductory overview on the various aspects involved in managing the laboratory environment. The content comprises the following topics: General concepts and administrative issues; optimizing efficiency in workflow processes; workload management; quality management and performance improvement; laboratory informatics and data management; financial management; staff management; laboratory safety; competitive performance in the market. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: I
COURSE CODE: BMET 3002
COURSE TITLE: LIGHT AND OPTICS IN MEDICINE
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1111 OR PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212,

PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 and PHYS 1216 OR

PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 and PHYS 1224

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Lasers and fiber optics have significant applications in medicine including in imaging and the illumination components of endoscopes to view internal organs. Flexible and rigid fiber cables with laser emitters and detectors are used to access organs. This course provides a background on fundamental optics, fiber optics, and lasers, and their applications to biomedical instrumentation. This course comprises: physics of fiber optics; fiber modes, transmission, and detection; fiber bundles; endoscopy imaging; sigmoidoscopy; colonoscopy; bronchoscopy; physics of lasers; laser classifications and characteristics; laser types; laser interaction with tissue; laser medical applications; laser radiation safety; clinical applications of fiber-optic laser systems. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: II
COURSE CODE: BMET 3004
COURSE TITLE: METROLOGY & REGULATORY STANDARDS
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES:

Available only to B.Sc. Biomedical Technology

                 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In the health sector, due to the inherent potential risk to life it is necessary to measure quantities as accurately as possible. The accuracy and reliability of medical measurements have direct consequences on each individual's health. In addition, medical decisions are often based on statistical analysis and on the conclusions of clinical studies. Medical measurements are incorporated within these studies and are correlated with other medical findings. Thus, the accuracy, reproducibility, and repeatability as well as the quality assurance (calibration, legal metrological control and reference measurement methods) of medical instrumentation must be assured.

This course introduces the metrology and regulatory framework and standards of certain categories of medical devices. This course comprises: metrology principles; quality in measurement and testing; the different international classification systems for medical devices; the life phases to developing medical devices; medical device design standards versus medical device operational standards; the regulatory framework for medical devices including the World Health Organization Medical Devices regulations; International Electrotechnical Commission standards for electrical equipment in medical practice and on medical device software;  Examples of metrological characteristics (methods and equipment) for specific equipment such as, but not limited to, electrocardiographs. This course will be assessed through in-course assignments and a final examination.

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