Last Updated: 10.9.2015

Undergraduate Admissions

 

Programmes | Course Description

 

              

 

PRE- REQUISITE COURSES

PHYS 0100:   N1 Physics I

PHYS 0200:   N2 Physics II    

PHYS 1001:   Introduction to Astronomy                

PHYS 1221:   Introduction to Mechanics  

PHYS 1222:   Introducion to Optics, Oscillations & Waves

PHYS 1223:   Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism

PHYS 1224:   Introduction to Thermodynamics & Modern Physics                 

 

CORE COURSES               

PHYS 2150:   Mathematics for Physicists           

PHYS 2151:   Classicial & Statistical Mechanics                

PHYS 2152:   Vibrations, Waves & Optics                 

PHYS 2153  AstroPhysics                 

PHYS 2155:   Major Laboratory Level II

PHYS 3150:   Electromagnetism

PHYS 3151:   Quantum Mechanics                 

PHYS 3152:   Advanced Thermodynamics & Solid State Physics                 

PHYS 3153:   Physics Major Research Project

PHYS 3155:   Major Laboratory Level III

 

MINOR IN ELECTRONICS               

PHYS 2401:   Optoelectronics

PHYS 2402:   Digital Circuits and Logic Design

PHYS 3201:   Advance Electronics and Control Theory

PHYS 3203:   Microprocessor and Modern Digital Design

PHYS 3202:   Practical Electronics 1

PHYS 3204:   Practical Electronics 2

 

MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS

PHYS 2156:   Meteorology & Climatology

PHYS 3156:   Physicsl Oceanography & Geohydrology           

PHYS 2157:   Solid Earth Geophysics

PHYS 3157:   Earth Science

PHYS 3158:   Fundamentals of Renewable Energy                 

PHYS 3159:   Environmental Physics Laboratory

 

MINOR IN MATERIAL SCIENCES           

PHYS 2165:   Materials Science I        

PHYS 2166:   Technological Materials

PHYS 3164:   Ceramics Science              

PHYS 3165:   Materials Science II                 

PHYS 3166:   Materials Science Laboratory

 

MINOR IN MEDICAL PHYSICS & BIO-ENGINEERING             

BMET 2001:   Bioengineering 

BMET 2002:   Introduction to Medical Pysics                 

PHYS 3160:   Medical Physics & Bioengineering Laboratory

PHYS 3167:   Radiation Biophysics & Medicine

PHYS 3168:   Medical Instrumentation

   

 

 

Level: 0

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 0100

Course Title: N1 PHYSICS I

Number of Credits: 0

Prerequisites: CSEC PHYSICS OR EQUIVALENT. IN EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES, DEPENDING ON ACADEMIC MERIT, THIS PREREQUISITE MAY BE WAIVED.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course focuses on the fundamentals of Mechanics, Heat and Waves.Students will study the kinematic and dynamic motion of particles in one and two dimensions, the fundamental forces and equations describing the motion of satellites in orbit around the earth, the conditions leading to equilibrium in mechanical systems and fluids, and the conservation of energy and its conversion with special reference to renewable energy sources (solar, wind, geothermal and wave). The course also allows you to describe the simple oscillating motion of a pendulum and the characteristics of simple wave motion. Students will be able to construct simple thermometers using properties of thermal equilibrium and thermal expansion, describe the variation of state properties of ideal gases using the ideal gas equation and use the kinetic nature of gas molecules to determine the state of the gas. You will learn how to calculate how much energy is conducted and radiated which depends on the nature of the material, how much work a gas does when expanding, whether thermal energy supplied or removed would be able to cause a phase change in a substance, and whether thermal energy is conserved. In this course, students will also have the opportunity to perform and interpret the results of simple experiments and demonstrations of physics. Applications to medicine and engineering will be discussed.

Assessment:

Theory Coursework                       20%

Practical Coursework                    30%

One three-hour Final Examination  50%

back to top

 

Level: 0

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 0200

Course Title: N2 PHYSICS II

Number of Credits: 0

PREREQUISITES: CSEC PHYSICS OR EQUIVALENT. IN EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES , DEPENDING ON ACADEMIC MERIT, THIS PREREQUISITE MAY BE WAIVED.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course focuses on the fundamentals of Electricity & Magnetism, Optics and Modern Physics. Students will be able to describe electric fields, apply Ohm’s law and Kirchoff’s law in designing electric circuits, and determine the size of a capacitor in a circuit to store electric energy and to discharge this energy across a resistor. Other designs you will encounter will be determining the speed of a charge moving in a magnetic field so that it does not undergo angular deviations, and the force between current-carrying conductors. Applications that you will meet in electromagnetic induction will include motors, generators and transformers. Under the optics component you will be able to appreciate the wave-particle nature of matter and energy and the concepts of reflection, total internal reflection and refraction. In addition, students will compute the optical characteristics of concave and convex mirrors and thin lenses for different optical applications for image formation which may include image formation for the eye, simple camera, telescope and spectrometer. Modern Physics will take you through a journey from the structure of the stable nucleus and “binding energy” to nuclear instability, radioactive decay and “mass defect” with applications in radioactive shielding, archaeology, and medicine. In this course, students will also have the opportunity to perform and interpret the results of simple experiments and demonstrations of physics. Applications to medicine and engineering will be discussed.

Assessment:

Theory coursework                        20%

Practical coursework                     30%

One three-hour Final Examination   50%   

back to top

 

LEVEL : INTRODUCTORY

Semester: 3

Course Code: PHYS 1001

Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: NONE

RESTRICTIONS: STUDENTS READING PHYS 3383 CANNOT BE CREDITED WITH THIS COURSE.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course develops the ideas of ancient astronomy leading up to the contributions of Copernicus, Brahe, Galileo and Newton. Optics and instrumentation. The solar system, stars: composition and evolution, white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes. Extragalactic Astronomy: Galaxies, dark matter, dark energy, Cosmology. Life in the Universe.

Assessment:

Coursework                                      40%

One two-hour Final Examination         60%

back to top

 

 

Level: 1

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 1221

Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: CAPE PHYSICS (UNITS I AND II) OR CAPE MATHEMATICS (UNITS I AND II) AND CSEC (CXC)

PHYSICS OR PHYS 0100 AND PHYS 0200 OR THEIR EQUIVALENT

COURSE DESCRIPTION:     

This course introduces the students to topics in Mechanics. The topics covered address Newtonian Mechanics including: kinematics, laws of motion, work and energy, systems of particles, momentum, circular motion, oscillations, and gravitation and concludes with topics in fluid mechanics. Through in-class discussions, problem-solving sessions and practical sessions, the student will have the opportunity to improve his/her ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical world using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions.                           

Assessment:

Final Examination (one 2-hr paper):           50%

Coursework:                                            50%

back to top

 

Level: 1

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 1222

Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO OPTICS, OSCILLATIONS AND WAVES

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: CAPE PHYSICS (UNITS I AND II) OR

CAPE MATHEMATICS (UNITS I AND II) AND CSEC (CXC) PHYSICS OR

PHYS 0100 AND PHYS 0200 OR THEIR EQUIVALENT

COURSE DESCRIPTION:    

The theoretical aspect of this course provides students with the fundamentals of Optics, Oscillations and Waves whereas the practical component allows all the Year I students to be exposed to a variety of techniques, concepts and skills in the experimental sciences. Through in-class discussion, problem solving sessions and practical exercises students will have the opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical world using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions.

 

Assessment:

Final Examination (one 2-hr paper):           50%

Coursework:                                            50%

back to top

 

Level: 1

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 1223

Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: CAPE PHYSICS (UNITS I AND II) OR

CAPE MATHEMATICS (UNITS I AND II) AND CSEC (CXC) PHYSICS OR

PHYS 0100 AND PHYS 0200 OR THEIR EQUIVALENT

COURSE DESCRIPTION::     

This course introduces the student to topics in Electricity, Magnetism and AC Theory. Through in-class discussion, problem-solving sessions and practical sessions, the student will have the opportunity to improve his/her ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical world using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions.

Assessment:

Final Examination (one 2-hr paper):           50%

Coursework:                                            50%

back to top

 

Level: 1

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 1224

Course Title: INTRODUCTION TO THERMODYNAMICS & MODERN PHYSICS

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: CAPE PHYSICS (UNITS I AND II) OR

CAPE MATHEMATICS (UNITS I AND II) AND CSEC (CXC) PHYSICS OR

PHYS 0100 AND PHYS 0200 OR THEIR EQUIVALENT

COURSE DESCRIPTION:     

This course introduces the student to topics in the fundamentals of Thermodynamics and Modern Physics. Through in-class discussion, problem solving sessions and practical exercises students will have the opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical world using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions.

Assessment:

Final Examination (one 2-hr paper):           50%

Coursework:                                            50%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 2150

Course Title: MATHEMATICS FOR PHYSICISTS

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course will introduce students to mathematical methods that will be used in advanced level Physics courses, as well as various applications in Physics. This course will focus on the following: Distribution functions, Sampling theory, Applications in Physics. Cartesian and Curvilinear Coordinate Systems, Vector Analysis, Complex Variable Theory, Fourier Series Analysis, Differential Equations (up to second order), and Applications of these methods in Physics.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                      40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                     60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 2151

Course Title: CLASSICAL AND STATISTICAL MATHEMATICS

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course provides a formal introduction to classical mechanics and statistical mechanics. Topics covered are under Classical Mechanics include Newtonian Mechanics for a system of particles, Lagrangian dynamics and Hamiltonian dynamics. Topics under Statistical Mechanics include microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical ensemble probabilistic tools, with applications to thermodynamic systems involving ideal gases, solids, and quantum gases.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 2152

Course Title: VIBRATIONS, WAVES AND OPTICS

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Optics: Review of thin lens imaging; reflection and refraction at a spherical surface; Lensmaker formula; Vergence and refracting power; Newtonian equation for a thin lens; Matrix methods; Aberration Theory.
Oscillations and Waves: Simple, damped and forced harmonic motion; Equations of motion and their solutions; Different aspects and applications of these motions; Equation of wave motion in one dimension; Longitudinal and transverse waves and the consideration of different examples of the propagation of these waves.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 2153

Course Title: ASTROPHYSICS

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111,

OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is designed to introduce the student to topics in the discipline of Astrophysics. Understanding Physics is crucial to the study of all Sciences. Physics is the study of matter, energy, space and time and gaining a better understanding of this subject is critical in understanding the world we live in and to a larger extent, the Universe in which we occupy. This course provides the students with fundamentals of Astrophysics.

Special Relativity (10 lectures): Introduction to theory of Special Relativity: Galiliean transformation, Postulates of Special Relativity, Lorentz transformation equations. The Foundations of Special Relativity.Relativistic kinematics and Relativistic Particle Mechanics.Space-time intervals and Minkowski diagrams.
Astronomy (15 lectures): Observational Instruments, Celestial Sphere and coordinate systems, Solar System, Astrobiology, Stars and their evolution, Galaxies, Extragalactic Astronomy, Cosmology and New Frontiers.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 1 & 2 (Year-long)

Course Code: PHYS 2155

Course Title: MAJOR LABORATORY LEVEL II

Number of Credits: 3 (Earned on completion of Year Long course)

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111,

OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Experimentation, observation and recording skills are very necessary for Physics. Experimental Physics is a modern, lab-based physics course where all Level 2 students will be exposed to a variety of techniques, concepts and skills in the experimental sciences at the advanced level. Laboratory experiments and numerical modelling using MAPLE and/or MATLAB are to be performed corresponding to the theory courses of the Major. The students will be expected to perform the exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit the written report at the end of the exercise or submit it the following week for assessment.

Assessment:

Coursework                                                                                                       100%             

The students will be required to submit the lab report for each of the experiment they will perform. Each lab will be marked and this will constitute the coursework.

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 2156

Course Title: METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111,

OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Meteorology: Structure and composition of the atmosphere. Meteorological elements and measurements. Physical processes in the atmosphere. Atmosphere motion and circulation, Geostrophic wind, gradient wind, cyclones, thermal wind, frictional effects, vorticity. The general circulation, frontal systems, circulation and disturbances of the tropics. Climatology and pollution: Climate controls, classification, regional climates, climates of the Caribbean. Land use, water resources, pollution.Aerosols.El Nino-Southern Oscillation.ITCZ.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 2157

Course Title: SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS

Number of Credits: 4

Prerequisites:  PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111,

OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Physics of the Earth: The shape of the Earth: The Geoid and reference Spheroid, Gravity of the Earth, Measurement of gravity, Corrections to gravity measurements (gravity reductions); Latitude; Elevation; Topographs of surrounding terrain; Earth tides, and Density variations in the subsurface. Testing Isostasy by gravity measurements.Geoid height anomalies.
Gravity Prospecting; Earth’s internal structure and origin; Heat Flow: Continental and Oceanic. Geophysical Prospecting:Propagation of seismic waves, The principles of seismic refraction and reflection. Electrical properties of rocks and minerals,Electrical prospecting methods: self-potential, dc resistivity, Wenner and Schlumberger arrangements. Earth’s Magnetic Field and Magnetic

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 2159

Course Title: INTRODUCTORY MEDICAL PHYSICS AND BIOENGINEERING

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

Course Description:

This course will emphasize a systemic view of human anatomy, hierarchy of structures, the function of the various systems of the body and an introduction to selected physiological functions in the human body. Additionally, the physics of the human body will be addressed in terms of the generation of electricity and the use of biopotential measurements in medical diagnostics. Through in-class discussions, and problem solving sessions, Students would have an opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical Universe using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions. Assessment and evaluation is done in the form of in-course tests and a Final examination.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2         

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 2160

Course Title: ADVANCED MEDICAL PHYSICS AND BIOENGINEERING

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisite:PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

Course Description:

The Medical Physics section of this course will focus on radiation diagnostic methods, corresponding equipment and image analysis in medicine in addition to the production and use of different radiation types for diagnosis and cancer therapy.  While in the Bioengineering section, human movement analysis, the development of prostheses and orthoses, the use of man-made materials in the human body, fluid flow and tracer techniques for diagnosis will be considered. Through in-class discussions, and problem solving sessions, Students would have an opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical Universe using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions. Assessment and evaluation is done in the form of in-course tests and a Final examination.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 2162

Course Title: DIGITAL ELECTRONICS I

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is one of four courses that constitute the Electronics Minor offered by the Physics Department, St. Augustine. It compares digital systems with analogue systems and introduces the student to digital theory and systems and electronic components and devices including optoelectronic systems and fibre optics. As such it provides building blocks for the other courses in particular the course on Further Digital Electronics and Microprocessors for which it is the prerequisite. Through in-class discussions, and problem solving sessions, Students would have an opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical Universe using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions. Assessment and evaluation is done in the form of in-course tests and a Final examination.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 2163

Course Title: ANALOG ELECTRONICS I

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224
        

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is one of four courses that constitute the Electronics Minor offered by the Physics Department, St. Augustine. It introduces the student circuit theory and analogue electronics and systems.. As such it provides building blocks for the other courses in particular the course on Electronics and Control Theory for which it is the prerequisite. Through in-class discussions, and problem solving sessions, Students would have an opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical Universe using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions. Assessment and evaluation is done in the form of in-course tests and a Final examination.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 2165

Course Title: MATERIALS SCIENCE I

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

Course Description:

The scope of materials science, importance of studying materials, interdisciplinary nature of materials science, principal aim to relate properties to structure, brief historical survey, the basic classification of materials – metals, polymer, ceramics, alloys, composites with brief description of structure, properties and applications.

The Structure of Solids:Structure of atom, molecules, bonding, relationship between bonding and properties, thermal vibration and structure sensitivity, crystal structure, lattice parameters, crystal geometries, defects in materials, point defects, line defects, area defects, defects in polymers, strengthening mechanisms, alloys. Amorphous structure, microstructure, alloys and composites.

Phase Diagrams:Introduction, solubility limit, phases, microstructure, phase equilibria, unary and binary phases, interpretation of phase diagrams, lever rule, eutectic and eutectoid alloys (binary systems), Iron-Iron carbide phase diagram, influence of alloying elements.

Polymers:Introduction, various polymer materials, molecular weight distribution, synthesis, properties, crystalline polymer, amorphous polymers, applications, models for various polymers.

Properties of Materials:Electrical properties, thermal properties, magnetic properties, optical properties, mechanical properties.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3        

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 2166

Course Title: TECHNOLOGICAL MATERIALS

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 2165 OR PHYS 2294

Course Description:

Earth Materials: Raw Materials, metals and their ores, importance of these materials, basic building blocks of earth materials, mineral chemistry, metal chemistry, glasses, ion conducting glasses, crystal structures, effect of temperature, pressure and environment on these minerals and metals.

Material Extraction Processes: Importance of extraction, principles of extraction, crushing of ores, separation of ores: gravity separation, magnetic separation, froth floatation process, leeching, calcination, roasting, reduction of free metal: smelting, reduction of aluminium, self-reduction process, electrolytic reduction, cyanide method, refining/purification; liquation, distillation, poling, zone refining, Mond’s process, Van Arkel process.

Characterization: Structure of metals and minerals, methods to determine structure, metallography, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, phase diagrams, electrical properties and their variations with phases, physical property determination.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3       

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 3150

Course Title: ELECTROMAGNETISM       

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisite:  PHYS 2150 or PHYS 2280

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Electromagnetic Theory
The electric field: Coulomb’s law. Discrete and continuous charge distributions. Divergence and curl of electrostatic fields; The electric potential: The potential of a localized charge distribution. Work and energy in electrostatics; Electric fields in matter: Polarization. The electric displacement and linear dielectrics; The magnetic field: The magnetic field, magnetic forces and currents. The Biot-Savart law. The magnetic field of a steady current. The divergence and curl of magnetic fields; Magnetic fields in matter: Magnetization. Response of materials to magnetic fields. The magnetic field inside matter. Ampere’s law in magnetized materials; Electrodynamics: Electromotive force and electromagnetic induction. Maxwell’s equations and the displacement current in vacuum and in matter; Electromagnetic waves: The wave equation for E and B. Electromagnetic waves in a vacuum. Electromagnetic waves in conductors and dielectrics.
Applications of Electromagnetism:
Waveguides: The rectangular waveguide. Transverse electric modes (TE) and transverse magnetic modes (TM). Propagation characteristics of rectangular waveguides; Antennas: Introduction to types of antennas. Antenna parameters in terms of the time-averaged Poynting vector.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 3151

Course Title: QUANTUM MECHANICS

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisite:  PHYS 2150 OR PHYS 2280

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The origins of quantum physics: Review of Blackbody radiation, the Photoelectric effect and the Compton Effect. Wave properties of material particles and electron diffraction. The Bohr atom.

The Schrödinger equation: Wave-particle duality: radiation as particles and electrons as waves. Development of a wave equation for a free particle and for a particle moving in a potential. The time-dependent and time-independent Schrödinger equations. The wave function and Born’s probability interpretation of the wave function. Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle. The momentum and energy operators.

One-dimensional problems: The free particle. Solutions to the Schrödinger equation for the infinite potential well. Stationary states of the infinite well. The potential barrier and quantum tunnelling. The harmonic oscillator. Applications.

Three-dimensional problems: Wave functions of the infinite cubical well. Degeneracy of the energy levels. Wave functions of the hydrogen atom and degeneracy of the spectrum.

Eigenfunctions, eigenvalues and operators: The eigenfunctions, eigenvalues and Hamiltonian operator of the Schrödinger equation. Normalization and completeness of the eigenfunctions. . Eigenvalues and measurement. The superposition principle and generalized time-dependent wave functions. Properties of wave functions.Expectation values of position and momentum.

Orbital and spin angular momentum: Representation of orbital angular momentum in quantum mechanics. Eigenfunctions of L2and Lz. Orbital magnetic moment in terms of orbital angular momentum.The Stern-Gerlack experiment and the spin hypothesis. Theory of spin 1/2 and the Pauli matrices. Spin magnetic moment of the electron in terms of spin angular momentum. Applications.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 3152

Course Title: ADVANCED THERMODYNAMICS AND SOLID STATE PHYSICS

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111, OR

PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Thermodynamics: Heat, Work, First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics – Applications: engines, refrigerators, Entropy, Maxwell’s relations, Joule-Thomson effect, Thermodynamic potentials, Magneto-thermal relations, Thermodynamic applications.
Solid State Physics: Structure of solids, elementary crystallography and crystal diffraction, free electron theory of metals, energy band theory, semiconductors, superconductivity.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3        

Semester: 1 & 2

Course Code: PHYS 3153

Course Title: RESEARCH PROJECT

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisite:  Available only to Physics Majors or permission of Head of Department

COURSE DESCRIPTION:     

Atudents will be required to complete a 12 weeks research project for completion of their Major in Physics. Projects will be offered in the various disciplines of Physics and each Project will be assigned a Project Supervisor. Projects may involve pure research study toward a fundamental aspect of Physics or address more applied issues. It may involve field or laboratory based work or may be a desk study involving data analysis or interrogation of legal documents. The project should, however, give the student a chance to further develop skills from the toolbox and a more detailed understanding of some component of the course. This course is offered in both Semester I & II

Assessment                            

A dissertation of up to 5,000 words and an oral presentation.

Dissertation Report                                                                                           80%

Oral Presentation                                                                                              20%

Only students who need not more than 30 credits to graduate will be assigned a project.

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3

Semester: 1 & 2 (Year-long)

Course Code: PHYS 3155

Course Title: MAJOR LABORATORY LEVEL III

Number of Credits: 3 (Earned on completion of Year Long course)

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Laboratory experiments are to be performed corresponding to the theory courses of the major. The students will be expected to perform the exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit a written report at the end of the exercise or the following week for assessment.

Course Rationale:

This course is one of two Laboratory courses addressing the practical component of the Physics Major at  Level 3, and covers all topic areas of the Level 3 advanced Major courses for Semester 1 and 2. Physics is based on scientific principles which are tested by practical experimentation. The purpose of the Experimental Physics course is to give students hands-on experience and to allow them to test the principles which they learn from the theoretical components of the courses at Level 2.

Assessment:

Coursework                                                                                                       100%             

The students will be required to submit the lab report for each of the experiment they will perform. Each lab will be marked and this will constitute the coursework.

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3        

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 3156

Course Title: PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY AND GEOHYDROLOGY

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Introduction to Physical Oceanography: Instruments and Measurements, Remote Sensing, Characteristics of sea water, Principles of fluid dynamics, Application to ocean circulation, Surface and deep water currents, Waves and wave generation, Tides, Coastal oceanography, Uses and problems of the oceans.
Introduction to Geohydrology: Water bearing formations, Groundwater flow, Darcy’s law, Equation of continuity, Laplace equation, Well hydraulics, Aquifer, Characteristics, Storage and transmissivity, Saline intrusion in coastal aquifers.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3        

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 3157

Course Title: EARTH SCIENCE

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Earth processes and Caribbean Stratigraphy: Properties of minerals and crystals; composition, occurrence, distribution, classification and field recognition of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks; tectonic and structural features of the earth; volcanic activity; formation of soils and sediments; stratigraphy and geologic time; plate tectonics. The Caribbean environment in relation to: man, water supply, soils, petroleum, engineering geology and minerals.
Introduction to Earth Materials: the origin, occurrence, world distribution and development of major earth resources- metalliferrous and non-metal ores, petroleum, coal building materials, chemical raw materials, biomass resources.
Earth seismology: the nature of earthquakes; the propagation and detection of seismic wave; geographical distribution of earthquakes; surface effects of earthquakes, earthquake history of the Caribbean.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3        

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 3158

Course Title: FUNDAMENTALS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ESST 2004 OR PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Introduction to current sources of Energy and World’s Oil production; Renewable Energy requirements, types and effects; Renewable Energy Technologies; Conservation, conversion and efficiency; applications and evaluation of renewable energy systems - solar energy, biomass, wind energy, geothermal energy and hydropower.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2 & 3

Semester: 1 & 2 (Year-long)

Course Code: PHYS 3159

Course Title: ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS LABORATORY

Number of Credits: 3 (Earned on completion of Year Long course)

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Laboratory experiments and field trips with site work are to be performed corresponding to the taught components of the Environmental Physics Minor. Students will be expected to perform the exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit the written report at the end of the exercise or submit it the following week for assessment.

Course Rationale:

This course consists of laboratory experiments, and/or field work and/or site visits covering topics in the Minor.  Physics is based on scientific principles which are tested by practical experimentation and case studies. The purpose of the Experimental Physics course is to give students hands-on experience and to allow them to test the principles which they learn from the theoretical components of the courses at this level for the environmental minor.

Assessment:

Coursework                                                                                                       100%             

The students will be required to submit the lab report for each of the experiment they will perform. Each lab will be marked and this will constitute the coursework.

back to top

Level: Undergraduate Level 2 & 3

Semester: 1 & 2 (Year-long)

Course Code: PHYS 3160

Course Title: MEDICAL PHYSICS AND BIOENGINEERING LABORATORY

Number of Credits: 3 (Earned on completion of Year Long course)

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ALL CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

Course Description:

Laboratory experiments and field trips with site work are to be performed corresponding to the taught components of the Medical Physics & Bioengineering minor. The students will be expected to perform the exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit the written report at the end of the exercise or submit it the following week for assessment.

Course Rationale:

The purpose of the Medical Physics and Instrumentation Lab Course is to give students hands-on experience and to allow them to test the principles which they learn from the theoretical components of the Medical Physics elective.  This course consists of laboratory experiments, and/or field work and/or site visits covering topics in the Minor. 

Assessment:

Coursework                                                                                                       100%             

The students will be required to submit the lab report for each of the experiment they will perform. Each lab will be marked and this will constitute the coursework.

back to top

Level: Undergraduate Level 3        

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 3161

Course Title: ANALOG ELECTRONICS II          

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ANY NINE (9) CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is an introduction to analysis and design of feedback control systems, including classical control theory in the time and frequency domain. This course explores the modeling of linear dynamic systems (physical, biological and information systems etc.) via differential equations and transfer functions utilizing input-output representations; analysis of control systems in the time and frequency domains and using transfer function methods; study of the classical stability tests, such as the Routh-Hurwitz and Nyquist criterions, and design methods using root-locus plots and Bode plots; and the development of control techniques based on PID, lead and lag networks, using linear state or output feedback. Through in-class discussions, and problem solving sessions, Students would have an opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical Universe using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions. Assessment and evaluation is done in the form of in-course tests and a Final examination.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3        

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 3162

Course Title: DIGITAL ELECTRONICS II

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 2162

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is one of the six courses that we offer at Physics Department as a part of the minor in Electronics and is an extension of the course Digital Electronics (PHYS 2162) taught in Semester I. The main objective is to build strong foundation for the students in the area of advance digital electronics and microprocessors fundamentals and to expose them to the entire digital systems design process from gate level to system level. An overview of advanced digital system design technologies and industrial grade Electronics Design and Automation (EDA) tools is provided to develop skilled manpower in the highly demanding area of System- On- Chip Design and to encourage entrepreneurship. Through in-class discussions, and problem solving sessions, Students would have an opportunity to improve their ability to reason through challenging situations in the physical Universe using basic principles to develop appropriate solutions. Assessment and evaluation is done in the form of in-course tests and a Final examination.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2 & 3

Semester: 1 & 2 (Year-long)

Course Code: PHYS 3163

Course Title: ELECTRONICS LABORATORY

Number of Credits: 3 (Earned on completion of Year Long course)

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ALL CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

Course Description:

Laboratory experiments and fieldtrip with site work are to be performed corresponding to the taught components of the Electronics Minor. The students will be expected to perform the exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit the written report at the end of the exercise or submit it the following week for assessment.

Course Rationale:

Physics department runs a minor in Electronics with 4 four credit courses. This course is a part of one of the six courses of Electronics minor providing necessary practical knowledge in the field of electronics. This course consists of laboratory experiments, and/or field work and/or site visits covering topics in the Minor. The students will be expected to perform the laboratory exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit the written report at the end of the exercise or submit it the following week for assessment.

Assessment:

Coursework                                                                                                       100%             

The students will be required to submit the lab report for each of the experiment they will perform. Each lab will be marked and this will constitute the coursework.

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3        

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 3164

Course Title: CERAMICS SCIENCE

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111
OR ALL CREDITS FROM: PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216
OR PHYS 1221, PHYS 1222, PHYS 1223 AND PHYS 1224

Course Description:

Definition and classification of ceramics; typical properties; engineering/industrial applications based on properties; crystal structure; raw materials; fabrication and processing; mechanical, thermal, electrical and magnetic properties; glasses; cement and concrete.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3        

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 3165

Course Title: MATERIALS SCIENCE II

Number of Credits: 4

Prerequisites: PHYS 2165 OR PHYS 2294

Course Description:

Iron and Steel: Raw Materials, Iron ore, purification processes, steel, steel making, blast furnace, electric arc furnace, types of steels and applications, processing of steels, forging, dye formation, extrusion, rolling, heat treatment. Steel phase diagram, isothermal phase transformations, cooling curves, properties and effect of impurities
Testing of the Materials: Destructive Testing: Brinell’s test, Rockwell test, Vicker’s test (macro and micro), knoop test (micro), izod and charpy tests. Non Destructive Testing: Visual, liquid penetration, eddy current, electric current perturbation, magnetic particle, ultrasonic testing, microwave testing, holography.
Microstructure of Polymers: Introduction to polymers, polymerization processes, crystallinity and amorphicity in polymers, microstructure of polymers, architecture, crystallization, mechanical and other properties of polymers, viscoelasticity, elastic after effect, stress relaxation, models for viscoelasticity and stress relaxation, dynamic response.
Composites: Introduction, different types of composites (particle reinforced, fiber reinforced, structural composites), microstructure of ceramics, mechanical and other properties of ceramics.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 2 & 3

Semester: 1 & 2 (Year-long)

Course Code: PHYS 3166

Course Title: MATERIAL SCIENCE LABORATORY

Number of Credits: 3 (Earned on completion of Year Long course)

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111, OR

PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213,PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216

Course Description:

Laboratory experiments and a field trip with site work are to be performed corresponding to the taught components of the Materials Science Minor. The students will be expected to perform the exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit the written report at the end of the exercise or submit it the following week for assessment.

Course Rationale:

Physics department runs a minor in Materials Science with 5 three credit courses. This course is one of the five courses of Materials Science minor providing necessary background knowledge the field of Materials Science. With the current global trends of the use of new and smart materials for various practical applications ranging in all the fields and its importance in future national and regional development, training and capacity building in materials, experimentation, observations and recording skills are very necessary.

Assessment:

Coursework                                                                                                       100%             

The students will be required to submit the lab report for each of the experiment they will perform. Each lab will be marked and this will constitute the coursework.

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3         

Semester: 2

Course Code: PHYS 3167

Course Title: RADIATION BIOPHYSICS AND MEDICINE

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111, OR

PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216

Course Description:

Introduction to cell biology and DNA: this part of the course addresses cell structure, division and functioning, DNA as the main target for radiation, genetics, functioning of cell and damages caused by different types of radiation.
Radiation damage and DNA repair. Cell death and mutation. Organ, tissue and organism effects of irradiation: This part of course addresses cell survival after irradiation and different biological and chemical mechanisms affecting the survival as well as DNA damage and repair. Tissue, organs and organism, effects of irradiation. Here the key knowledge of radiation effects is learned.
Modern methods of radiotherapy: This part of course addresses the main principles, modern methods of radiotherapy and combined therapies as well as tumor biology and responses of tumor and of normal tissues to radiation.
Radiation Carcinogenesis: This part of course addresses the development of cancer after radiation: type of malignancy, dosage, time responses and concepts of for risk estimations.
Radiation protection and legislation: This part of course addresses radiation accidents, radioecology, risk estimation and current legislation in radiation (International and Local). What we have learned after certain accidents and how to avoid high radiation doses or to minimize the consequences of irradiation.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

Level: Undergraduate Level 3         

Semester: 1

Course Code: PHYS 3168

Course Title: MEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 AND PHYS 1111, OR

PHYS 1211, PHYS 1212, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214, PHYS 1215 AND PHYS 1216

Course Description:

Electronic Instruments: voltmeters e.g. VTVM Transistor voltmeter, multimeter, use of cathode-ray oscilloscope for the measurement of voltage, current phase and frequency, special purpose oscilloscopes, measurement of resistance, inductance, capacitance, using Kelvin’s, Maxwell’s and Schering bridge, measurement of effective resistance at high frequency, R meter, LCR meter. Signal generators, function generator, wave analyzer, harmonic distortion analyzer, spectrum analyzer, spectrum analysis.
Transducers: operation of strain gauge, electromechanical transducer e.g. Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT), thermocouple, piezo- electric crystal, photoelectric transducers, light detecting resistor (LDR), SQUID, thermistors. Digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion techniques.
Data Acquisition System for patient monitoring: recording equipment: types e.g. graphic, strip chart, magnetic tape, digital tape and requirements. Safety issues: Macro and micro current shock, special design from safety consideration, safety standards, testing, ensuring protection of equipment and personnel.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: 1
COURSE CODE: PHYS 3201
COURSE TITLE: ADVANCE ELECTRONICS AND CONTROL THEORY
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: PHYS 2401 OR PHYS 2163
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course deals with two major areas of electronics. First part deals with the advance analog electronics and covers the concept of feedback, feedback amplifiers, multivibrators, differential amplifiers, operational amplifiers; related theory and their applications. Second part deals with control theory and explores modeling, analysis and design of feedback control systems using classical approach. This course builds foundation for the course ECNG 3019 - Advance Control System Design and prepares students for automation industry.

Assessment:

Coursework (Two in-course tests @ 20% each)                                                     40%

Final Examination (one 2-hour paper)                                                                    60%

back to top

 

 

LEVEL: III
SEMESTER: YEAR-LONG
COURSE CODE: PHYS 3202
COURSE TITLE: PRACTICAL ELECTRONICS - I
NO. OF CREDITS: 3
PREREQUISITES: PHYS 2401 AND PHYS 2402
OR PHYS 2162 AND PHYS 2163
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This laboratory course addresses the practical component of the Electronics Minor and covers all topic areas taught in four courses of the minor. This course provides the necessary practical knowledge in the field of basic as well as advance analog and digital electronics. The purpose of this laboratory course is to give students hands-on experience and to allow them to test the principles which they learn from the theoretical components of the courses. The students will be expected to perform the laboratory exercises and collect their data and depending on the complexity of the exercise will submit the written report at the end of the exercise or submit it the following week for assessment.

Assessment:

Coursework                                                                                                       100%  

back to top