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INRL 5009

THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF DIPLOMACY

Dr. Georgina Chami

 

Required Readings

  1. Cooper, A, Heine J, and Thakur, R (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy (Oxford University Press, 2013). Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013 (NGL-Reserve)

  2. Rudy Insanally, Multilateral Diplomacy for Small States: The Art of letting others have your own way, Georgetown: Guyenterprise Advertising Agency, 2013. Call number: JX1395 .I57 [2013] (NGL-General)

  3. Knight, W. Andy (ed.), Adapting the United Nations to a Post-Modern Era: Lessons Leaned, Palgrave/Macmillan 2005. Call number: JZ4984.5 .A33 2005 (NGL-Reserve; AJL-General)

 

Highly Recommended

  1. Baylis, J and S Smith. The Globalisation of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations. 6th Edition. Oxford University Press, 2014.  Call number: JZ1242.G58 2014. ( NGL- General/ Reserve; AJL- Reserve)

  2. Berridge, G.R., Diplomacy, Theory and Practice. 4th Edition. New York. Palgrave, Macmillan, 2011. Call number: JZ1405 .B475 2010 (NGL-Reserve)

  3. Cooper A. & Shaw T (eds.), The Diplomacies of Small States: Between Vulnerability and Resilience, Houndmills: Palgrave 2009. Call number: JZ5566 .D57 2009 (NGL- General)

  4. Feltham, R.G. Diplomatic Handbook. 6th ed. Harlow, Essex: Longman, 1993. Call Number: JZ1405 .F45 1998 (NGL-General)

  5. Knight, W. Andy & Tom Keating, Global Politics (Oxford University Press, 2010). Call Number: JZ1242 .K64 2010 (NGL-General)

  6. Pigman, Geoffrey Allen, Contemporary Diplomacy: Representation and Communication in a Globalized World. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press, 2010. Call number: JZ1305 .P54 2010. ( NGL- General)

  7. Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 1961. (UN International Law Commission http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_1_1961.pdf

  8. Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, Privileges and Immunities, 1963 ‐ UN International Law Commission – http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_2_1963.pdf

 

Course content:

The course will cover a range of thematic issues related to Diplomacy:

  1. History of Diplomacy

  2. Diplomacy in a Changing World

  3. Dimensions of Diplomacy: Negotiations, Foreign Policy and Information.

  4. Practice of Diplomacy: Diplomatic and Consular Relations, Protocol and Etiquette

 

Topics and Readings

 

Topic 1: Diplomatic Theory and Concepts

Session I: Introduction to International Diplomacy

In this introductory session, we will introduce you to the course, discuss the various topics that we will be covering over the upcoming weeks and readings that you will be required to do.

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will able to:

  • Identify and explain the scope of course, methodology and evaluation.

 

Readings

  1. Baylis, J and S Smith. The Globalisation of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations. 6th Edition. Oxford University Press, 2014.  Call number: JZ1242.G58 2014. (NGL- General)

  2. Berridge, G.R., Diplomacy, Theory and Practice. 2nd. Edition. New York. Palgrave, Macmillan, 2002. Richard Langhorne, “History and the Evolution of Diplomacy,” Diplo website: http://www.diplomacy.edu/resources/general/history-and-evolution-diplomacy

  3. Feltham, R.G., Diplomatic Handbook. 6th ed. Harlow, Essex: Longman, 1993  Call Number: JZ1405 .F45 1998 (NGL-General)

  4. Keens‐Soper, Maurice. François de Callières and Diplomatic Theory, in Diplomacy: Volume 1. Christer Jönsson and Richard Langhorne (eds): London: Sage Publications, 2004. Click here Available- Jstor (ask library staff for assistance)

  5. Siracusa, Joseph M.  Diplomacy: a very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Call Number: JZ1305.S57 2010 (NGL- General)

  6. Walter Roberts, “The Evolution of Diplomacy,” Mediterranean Quarterly, Summer 2006, found at http://www.publicdiplomacy.org/70.htm

 

Topic 2: Historical development of Diplomacy

Session II: Overview of International Diplomacy

In order to fully appreciate contemporary diplomacy, we have to explore its origins and development over an extended period of time. The roots of modern diplomatic practice can be traced back classical Greece, Renaissance Italy and it was only after seventeenth century that a semi-professionalised corps diplomatique began to emerge.

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will able to:

  • Identify and Explain the evolution of Diplomacy

  • Distinguish between "Old" and "New" Diplomacy.

Readings

  1. Andrew F. Cooper, “The Changing Nature of Diplomacy,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp.36-53. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013 (NGL-Reserve)

  2. Bjola, C and Kornprobst, M. Understanding International Diplomacy: Theory, Practice and Ethics. Routledge, 2013. Call Number: JZ1308 .B58 2013 (NGL-General)

  3. Jorge Heine, “From Club to Network Diplomacy,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp.54-69. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013 (NGL-Reserve)

  4. Kappler, Dietrich, Public Diplomacy: An overview of the evolution of a relatively new approach to diplomatic intercourse.

  5. Regala, Roberto, The trends in Modern Diplomatic Practice. Milano, Giuffre, 1959. Call number: JX1662 .R4 (NGL-Reserve)

  6. Sasson, Sofer, Old and New Diplomacy: A Debate Revisited. Review of International Studies. 14 (1988) 195‐211. Click here Available- Jstor (ask library staff for assistance)

 

Topic 3: Diplomacy in a Changing World

Session III: The Changing Environment of Diplomacy

In the post-1945 era diplomacy has gone through a significant transformation with the emergence of a wide-range of multilateral institutions, non-state actors, a growing selection of issues to discuss (not least economic, environmental and security) as well as dramatic changes in communications technology, which has led to ongoing debates about the role and significance of diplomats.

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will able to:

  • Issues and challenges: Including Science, Economic, Environmental, Cultural, Sport, digital.

 

Readings

  1. Ang, I et al. “Cultural diplomacy: beyond the national interest?” International Journal of Cultural Policy, Vol. 21, No. 4, (2015) 365–381. Click here

  2. Barston, R. P. Modern diplomacy. 4th edition. Routledge, 2014. Call number: JZ1405 .B37 2014 (NGL- General).

  3. Black, David & Byron Peacock, “Sport and Diplomacy,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp. 708-725. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013 (NGL-Reserve)

  4. Bollier, David, The Rise of Netpolitik: How the Internet is Changing International Politics and Diplomacy. A Report of the Eleventh Institute Roundtable on Information Technology. The Aspen Institute. http://www.aspeninstitute.org/.

  5. Goff, Patricia. “Cultural Diplomacy,” in in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp. 419-435. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013 (NGL-Reserve)

  6. Kappler, Dietrich, Diplomacy of Tomorrow: New Developments, New Methods, New Tools. Modern Diplomacy. Kurbalija (ed.). Malta: The Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies, 1998. 

  7. Kegley, Charles Wauthor.  World politics: trend and transformation. 2017 Call Number: JZ1310 .K45 2017  (NGL- General/Reserve)

  8. Kurbalija, J. (Ed.), Modern Diplomacy. Malta: The Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies, 1998. Click here

  9. Mills, Greg. “Trade and Investment Promotion,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp. 402-418. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013 (NGL-Reserve)

  10. Mohammed, Debbie. “International Relations in the Information Age: Redefining Diplomatic Processes and Challenges for the Commonwealth Caribbean”. IberoAmericana: Nordic Journal of Latin American Studies. Vol. XXXI: 2, 2001 pp.65‐83 Click here

  11. Saddiki, Said. “Diplomacy in a Changing World.” Alternatives: Turkish Journal of International Relations 5, no. 4 (Winter 2006): 93 – 105. Click here

  12. Woolcock, Stephen & Nicholas Bayne, “Economic Diplomacy, in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp. 385-401 Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013 (NGL-Reserve)

 

Topic 4: Diplomatic Relations, Privileges and Immunities (Guest Lecture)

Session IV: Types of Privileges and Immunities

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will able to:

  • Establishment of Relations, Suspension and Extinction.

  • Diplomatic Functions.

  • Theoretical bases of Immunities and Privileges.

  • Status and Inviolability and Immunity from Suit

 

Readings

  1. Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 1961. http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_1_1961.pdf

  2. Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations, 1946 http://www.un.org/en/ethics/pdf/convention.pdf

  3. Brown, J, Diplomatic Immunity: State Practice under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, The International and Comparative Law Quarterly, Vol. 37, no.1 (Jan. 1988), 53-89. Available- Ebscohost (ask Library staff for assistance)

  4. Feltham, R.G., Diplomatic Handbook. 6th ed. Harlow, Essex: Longman, 1993. Call Number: JZ1405 .F45 1998 (NGL-General)

  5. Langhorne, Richard, The Regulation of Diplomatic Practice: The Beginnings to the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, 1961, Review of International Studies, 01/1992, Vol.18(1), pp.3-17. Click here

  6. McClanahan, Grant V.  Diplomatic immunity : principles, practices, problem / Grant V. McClanahan ; with a foreword by Sir Nicholas Henderson.   London : Hurst, c1989. Call number: JX1671 .M32 1989 (NGL- Reserve)

  7. Sen, Biswanath, A Diplomats Handbook of International Law and Practice, 2nd Mc Clanahan, Grant. V. Diplomatic Immunity Principles, Practices, Problems. New York, St. Martin's Press, 1989. Call number: JX1662 .S44 1988 (NGL-Reserve)

  8. UN International Law Commission Report of 2001 on Diplomatic Protection. http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/reports/2001/2001report.htm

 

Topic 5: Consular Relations, Privileges and Immunities (Guest Lecture)

Session V: Types of Consular Relations

Learning Objectives:

  • Establishment of Consular Relations, Suspension and Extinction.

  • Consular Functions

  • Privileges and Immunities

 

Readings

  1. ‘Operation of the US Consular System.’ Congressional Digest 44, no. 12 (December 1965): 292. Available - Ebscohost (ask library staff for assistance)

  2. Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, Privileges and Immunities, 1963 ‐ UN International Law Commission ‐ http://www.un.org/law/ilc/texts/consul.htm  

 

 

Topic 6: Dimensions of Diplomacy: Foreign Policy and Diplomacy

Sessions VI: Factors and Determinants of Foreign Policy

Examine the formulation and implementation of foreign policy, how it is organized, what impact has recent developments in IR had on foreign policy making and on Organizations such as Ministries of Foreign Affairs who were traditionally the primary actors in this context.

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will able to:

  • Describe the Domestic and Foreign Policy Objectives.

  • Factors influencing Foreign Policy making

  • Agents of Foreign Policy ‐Foreign Ministries, Ministries of Foreign Affairs

  • Missions ‐ Embassies, High Commissions, Legations and Consulates.

 

Readings

  1. Cooper, Andrew, Jorge Heine and Ramesh Thakur, “Introduction: The Challenges of 21st Century Diplomacy,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp.1-31. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013 (NGL-Reserve)

  2. Insanally, Rudy. Multilateral Diplomacy for Small States: The Art of letting others have your own way, Georgetown: Guyenterprise Advertising Agency, 2013. Call number: JX1395 .I57 [2013] (NGL-General)

  3. Malone, David. “The Modern Diplomatic Mission,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp.122-141. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013 (NGL-Reserve)

  4. Mintz, Alex, Understanding foreign policy decision making. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Call number: JZ1253 .M56 2010 (NGL- General)

  5. Ó Súilleabháin, Andrea. “Small States Bring Big Ideas to the United Nations,” http://www.theglobalobservatory.org/analysis/517-small-states-bring-big-ideas-to-the-un.html.

  6. Petrič, Ernest.  Foreign policy : from conception to diplomatic practice. Leiden : Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2013. Call number: JZ1242 .P4758 2013 (NGL-General)

  7. The American Academy of Diplomacy, “Forging a 21st-Century Diplomatic Service for the United States through Professional Education and Training,” Feb 2011, found at  http://www.afsa.org/Portals/0/forging_21st_century_diplomatic_service_fu...

 

Topic 7: Dimensions of Diplomacy: Negotiations

Session VII: Bilateral and Multilateral negotiations

Negotiation is a crucial and central aspect of diplomatic practice. Engaging in negotiations with foes and partners in order to manage changes, maintain relations and forge new partnerships has been a key feature of diplomatic practice. This lecture will explore the structure and art of negotiation and the variety of ways in which final agreements can, and cannot be reached.

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will able to:

  • Regional and International Organizations, ‐ their role in the negotiation process.

  • Small Island States and the Negotiation Process.

 

Readings

  1. Bayne, N. and S. Woolcock eds. The new economic diplomacy: decisionmaking and negotiation in international economic relations. Aldershot, Hampshire, England, Ashgate, 2003. Call number: HF1359 .N4685 2003 (NGL-General/Reserve; AJL-General)

  2. Brzostowski, Jakub, and Tomasz Wachowicz. 2014. “NegoManage: A System for Supporting Bilateral negotiations.” Group Decision & Negotiation 23 (3): 463 – 96. Click here

  3. Mendoza, M.R. (eds) et al Trade rules in the making: challenges in regional and multilateral negotiations. Brookings Institution Press, c1999. Call number: HF1745 T73 1999 (NGL-General)

  4. Panke, Diana. 2012. “Small States in Multilateral Negotiations. What We Have Learned?” Cambridge Review of International Affairs 25 (3): 387-98. Click here

  5. Sung, Hankyoung. 2012. “Delays in Multilateral Trade Negotiations: An Experimental Study. Asian Economic Papers 11 (1): 160-76. Available - Ebscohost (ask library staff for assistance)

  6. Zerres, Alfred, Joachim Huffmeier, Philipp Alexander Freund, Klaus Backhaus, and Guido Hertel. “Does It Take Two to Tango? Longitudinal Effects of Unilateral and Bilateral Integrative Negotiation Training.” Journal of Applied Psychology 98, no. 3 (May 2013): 478 – 91. Available - Ebscohost (ask library staff for assistance)

 

Topic 8: Protocol and Etiquette

Session VIII: Role, Purpose and Functions

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will able to

  • Role, Purpose, Function.

  • Organization of Conferences and Social Occasions, State and Official Visits.

  • Greetings and Courtesies, Diplomatic and Consular Lists

 

Readings

  1. French, Mary. United States Protocol: the guide to official diplomatic etiquette. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., c2010. Call number: JZ1436.F74 2010 (NGL-General)

  2. Medina, Irene. “Andy Johnson apologises for diplomatic faux pas,” Trinidad Express 1 June 2013, found at http://www.trinidadexpress.com/news/Andy-Johnson-apologises-for-diplomatic-faux-pas-209817841.html

  3. Thomas-Roberts, Alice M.  Basic diplomacy and VIP courtesies Grenada: The Author, 2009. Call number: WI JZ1436.T46 2009 (NGL-General)

  4. US State Department, Foreign Service Institute, Protocol for the Modern Diplomat,  found at  http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/176174.pdf

 

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