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INRL 6008

CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL DIPLOMACY

Dr. Georgina Chami

Readings

 

  1. Cooper, A, Heine J, and Thakur, R (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy (Oxford University Press, 2013). Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013  (NGL-Reserve)

  2. Baylis, J and S Smith. The Globalisation of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations. 2nd Edition. Oxford University Press, 2001. Call number: JZ1242 G58 2017 (NGL-Reserve)

  3. Berridge, G.R., Diplomacy, Theory and Practice. 2nd. Edition. New York. Palgrave, Macmillan, 2002. Call number: JZ1405 .B475 2010 (NGL-Reserve)

  4. Cooper A. & Shaw T (eds.), The Diplomacies of Small States: Between Vulnerability and Resilience, Houndmills: Palgrave 2009. Call number: JZ5566 .D57 2013 (NGL- Reserve)

  5. Eban, Abba. The New Diplomacy: International Affairs in the Modern Age. New York, Random House, 1983. Call number: JX1662 .E22 1983 (NGL-Reserve; AJL-General)

  6. Feltham, R.G. Diplomatic Handbook. 6th ed. Harlow, Essex: Longman, 1993. Call number: JZ1405 .F45 1998 (NGL-general; AJL- General)

  7. Ikle, F. How Nations Negotiate. 1964, New York: Harper & Row. Call number: JX4473 .I4 (NGL-General; Reserve)

  8. Insanally, Rudy Multilateral Diplomacy for Small States: The Art of letting others have your own way, Georgetown: Guyenterprise Advertising Agency, 2013. Call number JX1395 .I57 [2013] (NGL-General)

  9. Kappler, Dietrich, Public Diplomacy: An overview of the evolution of a relatively new approach to diplomatic intercourse.

  10. Kurbalija, J. (Ed.), Modern Diplomacy. Malta: The Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies, 1998 Click here

  11. Nicholson, H., Diplomacy. 3rd. Edition. Oxford. Oxford University Press. 1973.

  12. Robertson, J & East M (eds.), Diplomacy and Developing Nations: Post Cold War Foreign Policy Making Structures and Processes, London: Routledge 2005. Call number: D887 .D57 2005 (NGL-General)

  13. Sharp, P. (2009). Diplomatic Theory of International Relations, Cambridge UK, Cambridge University Press. Call number: JZ1305 .S49 2009 (NGL-General)

  14. Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 1961. (UN International Law Commission http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_1_196...

  15. Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, Privileges and Immunities, 1963 - UN International Law Commission – http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_2_196...

Course content:

 

The course will cover a range of thematic issues related to International Organizations:

1. Evolution of Diplomacy

2. Functions & Forms of Diplomatic Practice: Forms of Communication, Diplomatic Immunities & Consular Relations

3. Negotiations

4. Protocol and Etiquette

Topics and Readings

Week 1: Introduction to Contemporary International Diplomacy course
Session I: About the course
Learning Objectives:
Students will able to:

  • Identify and explain the scope of course, methodology and evaluation.

 

Readings

 

  1. Baylis, J and S Smith. The Globalisation of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations. 2nd Edition. Oxford University Press, 2001. Call number: JZ1242 G58 2017 (NGL-Reserve)

  2. Berridge, G.R., Diplomacy, Theory and Practice. 2nd. Edition. New York. Palgrave, Macmillan, 2002. Richard Langhorne, “History and the Evolution of Diplomacy,” Diplo website: http://www.diplomacy.edu/resources/general/history-and-evolution-diplomacy Call number: JZ1405 .B475 2010 (NGL-Reserve)

  3. Feltham, R.G., Diplomatic Handbook. 6th ed. Harlow, Essex: Longman, 1993 Call number: JZ1405 .F45 1998 (NGL-general; AJL- General)

  4. Keens‐Soper, Maurice. François de Callières and Diplomatic Theory, in Diplomacy: Volume 1. Christer Jönsson and Richard Langhorne (eds): London: Sage Publications, 2004

  5. Walter Roberts, “The Evolution of Diplomacy,” Mediterranean Quarterly, Summer 2006, found at http://www.publicdiplomacy.org/70.htm

 

Week 2: Evolution of Diplomacy
Session II: Overview of International Diplomacy
Learning Objectives:
Students will able to:

  • Identify and Explain the evolution of Diplomacy

  • Distinguish between "Old" and "New" Diplomacy.

 

Readings

 

  1. Andrew F. Cooper, “The Changing Nature of Diplomacy,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp.36-53. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013  (NGL-Reserve)

  2. Jorge Heine, “From Club to Network Diplomacy,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp.54-69. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013  (NGL-Reserve)

  3. Kappler, Dietrich, Public Diplomacy: An overview of the evolution of a relatively new approach to diplomatic intercourse.

  4. Regala, Roberto, The trends in Modern Diplomatic Practice. Milano, Giuffre, 1959. Call number: JX1662 .R4 (NGL-Reserve)

  5. Sasson, Sofer, Old and New Diplomacy: A Debate Revisited. Review of International Studies. 14 (1988) 195‐211 Click here

 

Week 3: Contemporary Diplomacy
Session III: New Trends in Diplomacy
Learning Objectives:
Students will able to:

  • Issues and challenges: Including Security, Environmental and Migration.

 

Readings

 

  1. Bayne, N. and S. Woolcock eds. The new economic diplomacy: decision‐making and negotiation in international economic relations. Aldershot, Hampshire, England, Ashgate, 2003.

  2. Goff, Patricia. “Cultural Diplomacy,” in in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp. 419-435. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013  (NGL-Reserve)

  3. Kappler, Dietrich, Diplomacy of Tomorrow: New Developments, New Methods, New Tools. Modern Diplomacy.

  4. Kurbalija (ed.). Malta: The Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies, 1998.

  5. Kurbalija, J. (Ed.), Modern Diplomacy. Malta: The Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies, 1998. Click here

  6. Mills, Greg. “Trade and Investment Promotion,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp. 402-418. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013  (NGL-Reserve)

  7. Woolcock, Stephen & Nicholas Bayne, “Economic Diplomacy, in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp. 385-401 Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013  (NGL-Reserve)

 

Week 4: Diplomatic and Consular Relations
Session IV: Types of Privileges and Immunities
Learning Objectives:
Students will able to:

  • Diplomatic Functions.

  • Theoretical bases of Immunities and Privileges.

  • Consular Relations

 

Readings

 

  1. Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 1961. http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_1_196...

  2. Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations, 1946 http://www.un.org/en/ethics/pdf/convention.pdf

  3. Feltham, R.G., Diplomatic Handbook. 6th ed. Harlow, Essex: Longman, 1993. Call number: JZ1405 .F45 1998 (NGL-general; AJL- General)

  4. Sen, Biswanath, A Diplomats Handbook of International Law and Practice, 2nd Mc Clanahan, Grant. V. Diplomatic Immunity ‐ Principles, Practices, Problems. New York, St. Martin's Press, 1989.

  5. UN International Law Commission Report of 2001 on Diplomatic Protection. http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/reports/2001/2001report.htm

  6. Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, Privileges and Immunities, 1963 ‐ UN International Law Commission ‐ http://www.un.org/law/ilc/texts/consul.htm

 

Week 5: Protocol & Etiquette
Session V: Role and Functions of accredited representatives at international forums
Learning Objectives:
Students will able to

  • Explain modes of behavior at the UN Model simulation

 

Readings

  1. US State Department, Foreign Service Institute, Protocol for the Modern Diplomat at http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/176174.pdf

  2. Department of Foreign Affairs, The Government of South Africa, Protocol Training Manual: South African Protocol and Etiquette, 2006, found at http://www.salga.org.za/app/webroot/assets/files/MPAC/PROTOCOL%20TRAININ...

  3. Irene Medina, “Andy Johnson apologises for diplomatic faux pas,” Trinidad Express 1 June 2013, found at http://www.trinidadexpress.com/news/Andy-Johnson-apologises-for-diplomat...

 

Week 6: Coursework Preparation Week

 

Week 7: GROUP PROJECT

 

Week 8: International Negotiations
Session VI: Diplomacy of Foreign-policy making & leadership, Small State Diplomacy
Learning Objectives:
Students will able to:

  • Multilateral Diplomacy: Negotiating in the international arena.

  • Foreign Policy of Small States

 

Readings

 

  1. Bayne, N. and S. Woolcock eds. The new economic diplomacy: decision‐making and negotiation in international economic relations. Aldershot, Hampshire, England, Ashgate, 2003.

  2. Cooper, Andrew Jorge Heine and Ramesh Thakur, “Introduction: The Challenges of 21st Century Diplomacy,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp.1-31. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013  (NGL-Reserve)

  3. Kappler, D. Negotiating with the Help of Information Technology Multilateral Diplomacy and Negotiations: An Overview Diplomatic Negotiations: An Overview

  4. Malone, David. “The Modern Diplomatic Mission,” in Cooper et al, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy, pp.122-141. Call number: JZ1405 .O946 2013  (NGL-Reserve)

  5. The American Academy of Diplomacy, “Forging a 21st-Century Diplomatic Service for the United States through Professional Education and Training,” Feb 2011, found at http://www.afsa.org/Portals/0/forging_21st_century_diplomatic_service_fu...

  6. Insanally, Rudy. Multilateral Diplomacy for Small States: The Art of letting others have your own way, Georgetown: Guyenterprise Advertising Agency, 2013.

  7. Ó Súilleabháin, Andrea. “Small States Bring Big Ideas to the United Nations,” http://www.theglobalobservatory.org/analysis/517-small-states-bring-big-....

 

Week 9– Negotiation Simulation Preparation Week

There will be no formal class this week. It is important that students use this time to work on in-course assignments and a breather in the middle of the course.

 

Week 10: NEGOTIATION SIMULATION EXERCISE
Session VII: Class Activity

To fulfil the objectives of the role‐play simulation exercise, students are requested to observe the following in the Negotiation Simulation:
The attire for all presentations will be business casual.
Attendance is mandatory.

 

Week 11 –Protocol & Etiquette

 

Week 12 – Final Session

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