Master of Science in Global Studies

 

IIR

Application Process:

For further information, see the School of Graduate Studies and Research.

 

Programme Details

For further information, please see the guidelines for MSc. Global Studies:

Handbook for MSc. Global Studies for Academic Year 2017/2018

 

Global Studies* constitute a timely extension of international relations at the start of the second decade of the 21st century. Symbolically, this new master's degree commenced during the year of the Summits in Trinidad and Tobago in 2009.

Interdisciplinary, post-graduate global studies capture and reflect a half-dozen interrelated contemporary factors:

  • Changes in the structures of global interactions towards extensive, comprehensive yet uneven globalizations.
  • Proliferation of state and non-state actors, formal and informal, legal and illegal, in global affairs.
  • Multiplication of global issues to include brands, certification/ regulation, civil societies and social movements, coalitions, codes of conduct, cultural industries, Diasporas, drugs, ecology, energy, gender, health, mafias, multinational corporations, norms, religions, supply chains, Sovereign Wealth Funds, viruses, water and other areas.
  • Development, definition and recognition of new interdisciplinary field through university programmes and named professorships; professional associations/ conferences/ networks; academic journals and book series; and websites.
  • Recognition of global studies graduates through job definitions and internship opportunities.
  • Importance of the Caribbean's regional university — UWI — offering such a programme in, for and about the region.

* In Stephen Chan & Jarrod Wiener (eds) International History & the Twentieth Century (London: I B Taurus)

 

 

Courses 

Compulsory Core Courses

  • INRL 6001: Advanced Theory and Methodology: Globalization and Development
  • INRL 6003: Small States in the Global System
  • INRL 6004: International Trade, Development and Global Integration

Electives

  • INRL 6005: International Economic Law
  • INRL 6006: Multilateralism and Global Governance
  • INRL 6008: Contemporary International Diplomacy
  • INRL 6002: Selected Policy Issues in International Money and Finance
  • INRL 6007: Issues in Latin American Politics
  • INRL 6009: Themes and Issues in Contemporary US/ Caribbean Relations
  • INRL 6011: Diasporic and Development Dimension of Migration
  • INRL 6012: Global Environmental Governance
  • INRL 6000: Research Paper; the Research Paper carries 9 credits and is compulsory.
  • INRL 6020: Research Methods and Proposals Writing Course (3 credits). This is a required course. Students must pass the examination in this course in order to be eligible for the award of the M.Sc degree.

 

 

Course Descriptions

INRL 6001: Advanced Theory and Methodology: Globalization and Development (core course)

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester: Semester II

Lecturer: Prof. Andy Knight

Course Description

The objectives of this course are: to develop an analytical framework that critically examines the socio-political, cultural and ideational working of globalization and its relationship to demands of global development; to introduce students to a range of issues such as growth of the world economy, global governance, media and global culture, new non-state actors and social movements and to examine the Caribbean within the context of globalization.

The focus would be on Globalization, Development, Global Governance, Global Economic Restructuring, Global Culture, Global Diasporas, Global Gender Issues, Global Ecological Issues and Global Caribbean.

 

INRL 6002: Selected Policy Issues in International Money and Finance

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester: Semester II

Lecturer: Prof. Ramesh Ramsaran

Course Description

This course will be a seminar format with class presentations and discussion as the main instruments for dissecting and analyzing ideas and issues, as well as gaining an understanding of current concerns in the field of international money and finance. The course will focus on selected issues which have gained salience because of their systemic or policy significance in the context of liberalization and globalization trends currently sweeping the world economy. The challenge to long accepted premises and structures, forged in a controlled environment, has accelerated the pace of reform and led to new forms of operations largely driven by market forces which are playing a critical role in shaping the international financial and monetary architecture.

The course will cover four broad areas: International Financial Crises; Crisis and Reform in the International Monetary System; Aid and Development Finance and Globalization and Capital Markets.

The course seeks to identify and analyze critical issues in the area of international money and finance; to examine how liberalization and globalization of trade and financial markets affect the functioning and management of the International Monetary System; to analyze the implications of these developments for developing countries and specifically the Caribbean; and to provide a policy-oriented approach to address these issues.

 

INRL 6003: Small States in the Global System (core course)

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester: Semester I

Lecturer: Dr. Matthew Bishop

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to familiarise students with the distinctive political economy of 'small states'. The early classes focus on the conceptual debates surrounding smallness as a distinct 'category' within IR, and the difficulties faced by the multitude of small states in the world. Then, using these theoretical tools, the course moves on to take a comparative approach to the different regions in which many small states are located, namely: Europe, the Caribbean and Asia-Pacific. Case studies are utilised to highlight the broader debates in the subject, which pertain to issues of trade and liberalisation, migration and the 'brain drain', vulnerability and dependence, regional integration and development.

 

INRL 6004: International Trade, Development and Global Integration (core course)

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester: Semester I

Lecturer: Dr. Debbie Mohammed

Course Description

The objectives of the course are to assist the student: To understand the basic factors determining international trade; to better perceive the links between trade, growth and development; to provide insights into the design and implementation of trade policies and trade strategies; and to grasp the trade issues facing small economies.

The Course offers an advanced perspective on the links between modern international trade theory, growth and development. It starts by giving an overview of trade theories as well as the state of growth theory and development economics. The links between trade, growth and development are then explored both at the theoretical and empirical levels. This is followed by an examination of trade policies and trade strategies both at the national, regional and international levels paying due attention to the new economics of information and the trade issues facing small economies.

The following areas are covered: International trade and economic development, special reference to small economies; International trade theories: classical, modem new; Terms of trade and development; Trade policy for development: Free trade, protection, import substitution, export orientation; Commercial policy: tariffs, quotas, subsidies; Commodity exports and development: commodity markets. Export stability; import substitution; export orientation; International action of commodities (ICAS. ICF. STABEX); Theory and practice of economic integration:; Technology transfer and development; Trade in services; Trade-related investment issues; International Trading system; Structure: MTN, GSP, STSP, regional preferential schemes; Protectionism and structural adjustment;  State trading and trade between socialist countries and developing countries; and Developing countries and the world economy: NIEO.

 

INRL 6005: International Economic Law

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester:  Not currently offered

Lecturer:

Course Description

The course intends to: provide students with an understanding of the process of international law making in the area of international economic relations; to introduce students to the main legal principles which regulate these relations; to sensitise students to the changing structure of International Economic Law.

The main focus of the course will be on the regime regulating international trade. This includes an analysis of the decided cases and the role, which they play in the development of the law. The course comprises a series of lectures and group presentations. In view of the central role played by the World Trade Organisation part of the course will be devoted to a study of its principal organs and their relationship to one another.

Topics to be covered include: the Legal Structure of the World Trade Organisation; Non-discrimination and the Most-favoured-nation (MFN) Standard (Cases); Dispute Settlement; Trade in Services (Case); GATT and the Environment (Cases); and Caribbean Integration and the WTO.

 

 

INRL 6006: Multilateralism and Global Governance

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester:  Semester II

Lecturer: Dr. Annita Montoute

Course Description

The objectives of this course are: to expose students to an examination of, and debate on the key issues involved in global governance; to provide a forum for the exploration of the policy-making processes of key multi-lateral organisations and to examine the role and functioning of the identified organisations in the GPE; to examine the place and involvement of developing and Caribbean countries in the multilateral institutional process and the latter’s impact on their policy autonomy; and to expose students to the major source of challenges to existing global governance frameworks.

The course would be structured on: the examination of the three broad branches of international organisations: the UN system, the Bretton Woods institutions (including the WTO) and regional organisations within the context of multilateralism being a major defining dimension of contemporary Global Political Economy (GPE); the analysis of the impact of globalisation and the emergence of global problems which are forcing global institutional management of the GPE; the examination of the changing roles, expanding responsibilities and the opening up of participatory bases of these international organisations and the emergence of regionalism and regional organisations as central facets of the structures of GPE as strategic responses to globalisation and building blocks of mulitlateralism.

 

INRL 6007: Issues in Latin American Politics

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester:  Semester II

Lecturer: Dr. Mark Kirton

Course Description

This course is centered on the major political and socio-economic issues in contemporary Latin America. It combines theoretical approaches to the understanding of the political dynamics of the region with in-depth study of the major issues.

At the end of the course students will acquire the capacity to critically analyze theoretical frameworks and their application in the Latin American context, identify the major institutions and practices of government in Latin America and apply comparative methods to assess current political issues in the region.

 

INRL 6008: Contemporary International Diplomacy

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester:  Semester II

Lecturer: Prof. Andy Knight

Course Description

The objectives of this course include providing students with an appreciation of the complexities, problems, anomalies, and challenges of diplomacy and understand its nature and significance as a global activity in a dynamic international system. Students will also be encouraged to develop the capacity to think critically, creatively and independently to assess diplomatic relations among different groups of international actors within both bilateral and multilateral contexts, through critical analysis of a wide range of resources, including documents, monographs, periodicals, news-reports and relevant electronic sources.

 

INRL 6009: Themes & Issues in Contemporary United States/ Caribbean Relations

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester:  Not currently offered

Lecturer:

Course Description

This course is intended to explore the evolution of relations between the United States of America and the states of the Caribbean, within the context of shifting patterns of US hegemony. The course will be divided into three parts: historical, conceptual and empirical. The first of these will look at the historical rise and decline of US power, globally, beginning with the initial expansion of US imperialism and consolidation of the Americas in the 19th Century. It will then look at the Cold War, followed by the post-1989 period of globalisation and waning US hegemony. Part Two of the course will focus conceptually upon the notion of ‘hegemony’ and the ways in which US power can be understood through this particular prism. Then, in Part Three we shall use these theoretical tools to assess how US power has waxed and waned in the Caribbean across seven interrelated issue-areas which we separate in the course for the purpose of analysis: politics; economics and trade; security; migration; culture; development; and the environment.

 

INRL 6011: Diasporic and Development Dimension of Migration

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester:  Not currently offered

Lecturer:

Course Description

This elective exposes students to the phenomenon of transnationalism and the growing salience of Diaspora to the field of IR since the 1990s. Critical issues resulting from migratory flows of Caribbean people to the North Atlantic include brain drain and brain gain, social and financial remittances, migration and climate change, irregular migration and the mass return of criminal deportees to the region. Comparisons will be made between Anglophone and Francophone Caribbean diasporic communities, as well as Caribbean-Latino diasporic communities (Puerto Rico, Cuba and the Dominican Republic), for a fuller appreciation of the diverse Caribbean diasporic dynamic.

 

INRL 6012 Global Environmental Governance

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester:  Semester II

Lecturer: Dr. Michelle Scobie

Course Description

Environmental Governance is truly a global studies and interdisciplinary area, straddling as it does law, science, theory, academia, policy and (inter alia) ethics.  Its range of actors –states, transnational companies, non-governmental organisations, civil society groups, regional and international policy makers etc- reflects the globalised world in which we live and the solutions which are equally global in scope. 

Environmental governance has rapidly widened and deepened since the Stockholm Declaration of 1972, and covers areas ranging from climate change, integrated maritime governance, and biodiversity, to security, poverty, development and human rights as they relate to the environment.  There are hundreds of environmental treaties and several international and regional intergovernmental agencies responsible for the implementing of these agreements.

Global Environmental Governance is an area of particular relevance to Small Island Developing States (SIDS) which are particularly vulnerable to environmental degradation where both sources of such degradation and the solutions to these problems often lie beyond the borders of these small states.

Students will be given the tools to participate and critically contribute to the global debates on environmental governance.  In addition to being aware of the existing international environmental law and regulations, students will become very familiar with the mediums (organizations, regimes etc) that continue to implement and shape international law and policy on the environment.  Furthermore, students will be aware of and be able to take personal positions on the ethical issues and the theoretical debates regarding trends in global environmental governance which will enable them to be valuable point persons for the Region’s environmental foreign policy formulation and implementation.

 

INRL 6020: Research Methods and Proposal Writing Course

Programme: MSc Global Studies

Semester:  Semester I

Lecturer: Dr. Godfrey St. Bernard

Course Description

This course addresses research methods focusing on the different stages that are essential in the process of generating knowledge for decision-making purposes. In particular, these methods and related tools are examined in the context of research problems and questions that arise in the field of international relations. At the end of the course, students will be expected to write and present a proposal outlining their intentions to undertake a systematic research initiative that embraces scientific principles.

 

INRL 6000: Research Paper

N.B. While INRL 6000 – Research Paper begins in Semester I, the student must register for this course for Semester II.

Please find additional guidelines concerning the Research paper in the IIR MSc Thesis Guide.

See MSc Global Studies Guidelines INRL 6000 Research Paper 2013/2014